Tag Archive | "wonderful food"

Ecuador Food & Nutrition


Ecuador food and nutrition are often a surprise to those who visit the country for the first time. Ecuador shamanic nutritional ideas can help health, energy and longevity.

Ecuador nutrition strikes again.  Last week a message at this site showed how, upon moving to Ecuador, Jim Reed lost 55 pounds in the last year… without trying.

A reader just sent this note which contains this common Ecuador weight loss refrain.

Hi Merri, Thanks again to you and Gary for your help when I was checking out Cotacachi.  Things have worked out well.  I am healthier than I have ever been, lost 32 pounds since arriving in Sept.  Bought a house and have finished the first level.  What an amazing place you have found.  Thanks Phil

Ecuadorians are noted as among the longest lived people on earth. This is, in part, from Andean foods and nutritional habits that began long ago. Since ancient times Andean Yatchaks, Shamans and Curanderos have taught healthy living supported by good nutrition. They based these healthy lifestyles on three ideals; clean food, good food combinations and a correct fat, carbohydrate and protein balance.

One reason Ecuador food is so good is that it is so fresh!

Cotacachi-food-market

Cotacachi food is really inexpensive too.

Our seafood in Cotacachi is fresh brought right from the coast.

Cotacachi-fresh-seafood

Here we are with our chef Santiago after buying seafood from the Ibarra market.

Nutrition is a huge problem in North America.

Excerpts from an article published in USA Today entitled “20% of U.S. preschoolers are obese” by Lindsey Tanner shows that dietary problems are still growing.  The excerpt says:   A striking new study says almost 1 in 5 American 4-year-olds is obese, and the rate is alarmingly higher among American Indian children, with nearly a third of them obese.

Overall, more than half a million 4-year-olds are obese, the study suggests. Obesity is more common in Hispanic and black youngsters, too, but the disparity is most startling in American Indians, whose rate is almost double that of whites.

The lead author said that rate is worrisome among children so young, even in a population at higher risk for obesity because of other health problems and economic disadvantages.

“The cumulative evidence is alarming because within just a few decades, America will become a ‘minority majority’ nation,” he said. Without interventions, the next generation “will be at very high risk” for heart disease, high blood pressure, cancers, joint diseases and other problems connected with obesity, said Flores, who was not involved in the new research.

The study is an analysis of nationally representative height and weight data on 8,550 preschoolers born in 2001. Children were measured in their homes and were part of a study conducted by the government’s National Center on Educational Statistics. The results appear in Monday’s Archives of Pediatrics & Adolescent Medicine.

The current study looked only at obesity and a specific age group. Anderson called it the first analysis of national obesity rates in preschool kids in the five ethnic or racial groups.

This study shows that poor nutrition is a North American plague and it is embedded in every portion of the culture.

There is a lot we can learn about nutrition from Ecuador shamanic disciplines.

Our restaurant in Ecuador, the Quinoa Cafe celebrates the wisdom of the past and combines it with the unity of mankind. We continually serve fresh fruit…at coffee breaks.

Cotacachi-fresh-food-flowers

Quinoa Cafe’s core bill of fare is Quinoa, often referred to as the Andean grain, a wonderful food, native to the Andes. Quinoa sustained the ancient Incas and has been grown continuously for over 5,000 years. The plant thrives in poor soil, and the high mountain terrain of South America’s Andes.

Qunioa has been described as the super grain. Actually it is the SEED of a leafy plant that’s related to spinach. What makes quinoa special is that it has a very high protein content, more than any single grain. Plus unlike grain, Quinoa has the amino acid lysine, so the protein is complete. The World Health Organization ranks quinoa protein equivalent to milk. Quinoa offers more iron than grains and contains magnesium, zinc, copper, manganese, potassium, riboflavin, thiamin, B vitamins: B6, niacin, magnesium, zinc, copper. It is also a good source of folate (folic acid).

Quinoa is delicious and can be substituted for almost any other grain.

A lot of stress comes from poor nutrition. Quinoa offers an optional, delicious purifying and the diet you will enjoy at the farm can enhance your rest and boost your energy and heath as well as reduce your weight without any feelings of giving up or not enjoying your food.

Ecuador shamanic nutritional goals provide a delicious menu that improves digestion, reduces weight, increases energy, reduces toxicity in the system and balances the hormonal system so cravings and excessive hunger disappear. This system was taught to Merri and me, when we lived with Andean Yatchaks in an indigenous community.

The cornerstones of the Andean nutritional program are:

#1: Eating a balance of fat, carbohydrates and protein.

#2: Eating combinations of food for ideal digestion.

#3: Eating clean organic food prepared and served by happy, joyful people.

#4: Eating in good spirits at the right times.

#5: Chewing in the correct way.

#6: Eating purifying and satisfying meals.

#7: Balancing nutritional with correct sleep and exercise.

Here is what we will learned.

#1: Eat a balance of fat, carbohydrates and protein.

Our diet keeps protein balance without excessive amounts of meat using quinoa, eggs, cheese and yoghurt instead. A great deal of poor health and stress is tied in to the underlying hormonal disturbance caused by the excess production of insulin. This imbalance normally comes from too much food and incorrect protein, carbohydrate, fat balances in the diet. Every time we eat, hormones in our body will change, either good or bad. Delicious food with a balance of 3 parts carbohydrates, two parts protein and one part fat has the power to orchestrate beneficial hormonal changes in our body.

#2: Eat the correct combinations of food for ideal digestion.

Andean nutritional ideals also focus on combining foods in a way that avoid fermentation in the stomach. Foods and spices are divided into three types neutral, savory and sweet. Neutral can be mixed with savory or sweet, but no savory and sweet foods are mixed. The main neutral foods are grains, cereals, nuts and seeds. Meat and most vegetables are savory. Fruits are sweet. Cereals are ground and soaked to improve their digestibility. Sweet spices include cinnamon, nutmeg, allspice, ginger, mint. Savory spices include sale, pepper, chiles, oregano, corriander, bay leaf, cumin, saffron, fennel. No two fats are mixed nor are fruit types.

#3 & 4: Eat clean organic food prepared and served by happy, joyful people and eat in good spirits at the right times. Food should be beautiful as well…like this feta salad we eat at home.

feta-cheese-salad

Candace Pert, Ph.D., is a neuroscientist who was awarded a Nobel prize for her groundbreaking work that shows the mind is not just in the brain but in the entire body. The mind and body communicate using the chemistry of emotion. Short chains of amino acids called peptides and receptors are found in the brain, stomach, muscles, glands and all major organs. They send messages back and forth linking mind and body. When we are happy our entire body is happy and reverse and this chemistry has a dramatic impact on our food and digestion.

Andean beliefs view the body composed of three elements earth (Pacha mama), fire (Taita Inti) and air Pacha Kuti.

There are times of the day when each of these elements are most active. The digestive fires are highest at 12 noon, so a savory meal is normally eaten at this time.

A sweet breakfast accommodates a more sluggish digestive time and the evening is set aside for a purifying fruit meal so the body can use the midnight fire energy to cleanse rather than digest.

Three herbal teas are served. In the morning cinnamon tea is served. Before lunch ginger tea lights the digestive fires and before sleep chamomile tea enhances a good night’s rest.

Part of good nutrition comes from eating, sleeping and exercising at the correct times.

The yatchaks also suggest we eat only when hungry and the stomach is empty so we recommend eating only every four hours. For cravings between herbal tea is best and juices can be added if it is uncomfortable to wait for the next meal.

#5: Chewing in the correct way.

Correct chewing releases nutrient molecules so energy from food is more quickly released and assimilated. This allows the brain to recognize flavors and release the correct digestive juices for that food. Proper chewing does even more because it stimulates the bodies sphincter (or ring) muscles that surround the various orifices of the body.

Ring muscles include the muscles around the eyes, the nostrils, anus, urethra, genitals and the mouth. In a healthy body, all sphincters work together, contracting and relaxing simultaneously. They also activate the respiratory system, the gastrointestinal system, the circulatory system, the lymphatic system, the musculoskeletal system and the urogenital system. Ring muscles are ultimately responsible for putting all the other muscles and all the organs of the body to work.

Chewing correctly stimulates the ring muscles and consequently helps exercise all our muscles.

#6: Eat Purifying and satisfying meals.

Fruit types also exist and are never mixed. Citrus stands together, but is not mixed with other foods. Watery fruits (apples pears, plums and grapes) can be mixed. Bananas are eaten alone only or with dairy only. Pineapple and melons are also eaten alone.

There are three purifying meals we will learn about during the course. The first most gentle purifier is a water combination of apples and grapes. The second meal is an entire pineapple and the third, an entire watermelon.

Organic coffee, tea and cocoa are great purifiers rich in antioxidants. Coffee and some tea is avoided by those who do not want caffeine. We recommend moderation and serve only organic, fair trade coffee and tea Coffee and tea (without milk) are neutral and can be consumed before or with any meal.

Finally the shamans drink and wash in  an Andean cleansing tea made from cinnamon, sweet pepper and chamomile.

#7: Balance nutrition with exercise and sleep.

Each day we do gentle but profound exercises to stimulate organs, glands and energy points.  We do not have television and go to bed before the evening fire cycle begins at 10 PM for more restful sleep.

Click here to read more about Ecuador water and food

Whatever your goal… weight loss,,, more energy….better health or a longer life, these ideas on Ecuador food and nutrition can help you whether you visit Ecuador or not.

Gary

Read the entire article published in USA Today entitled “20% of U.S. preschoolers are obese” here.

Cotacachi Crime Concerns


Numerous readers have sent Cotacachi crime concerns which we share here.

You are a salesman.  A salesman will tell you anything.  You know it is dangerous to live down there. Gayle

I often get notes like this …usually from people who have never been to Ecuador.  Galyle has one point correct for sure.  I have been a salesmen going on 41 years and always considered it a privilege to sell things I truly love and live myself…like Cotacachi Ecuador.

Really the village does not need selling. Cotacachi sells itself. All I have to do is tell the truth…so I sometimes get comments like this.

I visited Cotacachi and your hotel Meson de las Flores. It was exactly as you described it. I felt safe the entire time I was there. Thank you!  Monica

We’ll review more comments on Cotacachi crime in a moment…but one thing that is not a crime in Cotacachi or Ecuador is the great quality and cost of food. I just returned from Oregon and spent some time on the coast. Dungeness crab was $28 a pound…smoked salmon $19 a pound.  That seems like a crime to me!

The wonderful lakes around Cotacachi means we have great fish.  This is Lake San Pablo.

Cotacachi-fish

Here is a high Andean lake above Cotacachi.

Cotacachi-fish

and the trout they catch there.

Cotacachi-fish

Back to crime…let’s read what some people who live in Ecuador say about crime.

Hello Gary, Here’s a New York Times article you may have seen about an Ecuadorian man who was beaten and stabbed to death in New York. He was basically killed for sport…a hate crime.

Personally, I’ve been a crime victim a few times in Ecuador. During my six years there, I lived and traveled among the general population in a large city. I used the public transit system, the local markets, the bus stations… In this situation, you’re bound to be unlucky sooner or later.

But even in the worst of areas, I never worried for my safety. All I lost was money–or replaceable items–and I never carried any more than was necessary. I didn’t (and still don’t) worry that I’ll be killed or beaten for fun, or because I’m the wrong color or nationality.

My personal experience has been that Ecuadorians are basically non-violent people. They steal out of need. What little I lost likely went to feed a family… Best regards,  Lee

I agree with Lee. When you talk to people who have lived in Cotacachi or most parts of Ecuador…they’ll agree…petty theft is a problem from which you must protect…but hate crimes basically do not exist and violent crimes are rare.  Another reader who was a visitor to Ecuador wrote this note.

Hey Gary, first time in Ecuador, flew down from Quito to Guayaquil, heard how dangerous it was everywhere, been walking the streets day and night.  I wear a $15,000 gold watch. Today, I rented car, drove to Montanita.  Tomorrow, I am driving north, along the beach coast, then back to Guayaquil for a few days then over to Peru.   I´m from Mobile.   We have several shootings, stabbings, hit and runs a week, along with other crime. The bottom line is that most crime comes from just being at the wrong place at the wrong time. One of my next trips is Caracas, murder capital of the world…and yes, I am alone and over 60.  I will be in the Dominican Republic for Christmas and New Years, surfing with my kids. Bobby.   The only thing I suggest is it is better to burn out, than rust out.

I urge more caution than Bobby takes but could not agree more with his philosophy of enjoying life and embracing the incredible riches we have in today’s society instead of wasting away worrying about what bad could happen. Life is too short!

Back to fish. Merri and I love to accompany our chef, Santiago, to the Thursday fish market in Ibarra. I can buy about 20 pounds of crab for the same price as one pound in Oregon and it is really fresh!  One of our favorite jobs is helping the chef!

Cotacachi-fish

We also love watching the fishermen at work when we are on Ecuador’s sea.  Here is our last Coastal real estate tour watching the fishing on the Chone Estuary at Bahia.

Bahia-fishermen

There is a big modern town behind these Ecuador fishermen…

Bahia-fishermen

but they are pretty low tech!

Bahia-fishermen

Just canoes and poles…no gas surcharge here.

Bahia-fishermen

The fishermen who fish outside our hotel in San Clemente are even more low tech…no boat!

San Clemente-fishermen

We took our last group for a sea food meal in Manta.

Manta-fish-meal

Where this most expensive dish on the menu…a full lobster meal was $12.

Manta-fish-meal

My grilled fish was $6. That was no crime!

Which brings us back to Cotacachi crime. 

This reader who lives regularly in Cotacachi wrote:

Gary,  As you now I have traveled to Ecuador and the Cotacachi area many times over the last several years; nine times I think. I have always felt safe even during the evening walking about Cotacachi and have never felt threatened there or in Quito or the coastal areas. I always try to be aware of my surroundings and the level of cautions I may consider appropriate as I would anywhere in the world I am traveling, for example, in Quito I usually put my wallet in my front pocket. However, reading the accounts of crime in the area lately, and I appreciate your alert, I felt a little concerned as a North American. In the interest of thoroughness on this topic my alarm is that the message is we are being targeted. This may be obvious. As anywhere the perceived affluent are vulnerable. In this culture we stand out and In this sense we present opportunity and perhaps in the perpetrators mind fair game. I would only say that a common sense realistic awareness of taking precautions in unfamiliar areas in an unfamiliar culture is important. I think that you and Merri provide a real service with up to date information for safe travel and areas to live and lodge in Ecuador. Your tours also provide an excellent environment for safe guided travel.

Since I have had so little trouble with any sort of crime in Ecuador what I tend to recall are the simple unexpected kindnesses which I have encountered.  One time while  shopping at the Otavalo indigenous market unknowingly I dropped a small package only to turn around to see a little indigenous child running up to me tugging at my sleeve with a smile and handing it to me. Another time at the bank in Cotacachi I was  trying to cash a $100 bill – can be difficult as many know due to the fear of counterfeiting from Columbia. There at the bank after waiting in line for an hour only to be refused change due to that I did not have an account or permanent address they said; I left in exasperation. Unknown to me a young woman was observing  and having empathy for my plight had withdrawn an extra 5 twenty dollar bills from her account and rushing down the street to find me offered them to me in exchange for the 100 dollar bill. “De Nada” she said.

These are a few of the experiences of innocent kindness in Ecuador and of the Ecuadorian people that I choose to remember over my fears of crime. Thanks for keeping us aware and informed in our travels and adjustment to new and unfamiliar areas and culture.  Jim

Here is another note from a gringo who is resident in Ecuador.

Gary, I would like to add the following on crime in general in Ecuador. I have spent the past 9 years living in the Mariscal neighborhood of Quito, 6 months each year.  Many consider this a likely neighborhood to encounter crime in Ecuador since there is much tourism, thus many opportunities to rob people who actually have money or valuables on them.  I walk the streets until about 10 PM.

Ecuadorians are gentle peoples: They are not Cali, Caracas or Miami.  The indigenous peoples who inhabit the provinces north of Quito are among the most stable, economically affluent, and culturally integral of any class of people in Ecuador.  Crime is minimal as it is in most small towns in the USA.

Crime in Ecuador tends to be petty thievery, taking a backpack or purse from a cafe, stealing “things” which are left in the open unguarded.  Ecuadorians are not  a “gun culture” as exists in the United States.  It is beyond their imagination that a person would rob and kill another for a pair of tennis shoes.  It is further beyond their imagination that a young person would mass kill his classmates at school, and that the state would continue to allow unlimited access to hand guns and semi automatic weapons.The crime of Ecuador is based more on poverty, although there exists a cultural flaw in many people committing petty theft even when they do not need an item. These events are rarely associated with violence to people.

I’m a street smart kid (63) who grew up in Chicago’s south side and I know that Miami, Los Angeles, New York, Chicago, Washington DC, New Orleans, and just about every major and “medium size ” US city is far more dangerous that most any city or neighborhood of the largest cities of Ecuador.  Only 2 cities of Ecuador have any significant crime, Guayaquil and Quito, and then only selective neighborhoods.   Almost all the people I know who have been robbed (6 or 7) in Quito have been men walking home drunk late at night oblivious to using their normal street senses.

Gary, if you do a follow up, feel free to include my comments.

I agree that the Mariscal neighborhood of Quito is one of the riskier areas due to tourism…and that it is not the nature of Ecuadorians to be violent.  We love the people here…the great scenery…the wonderful food…the low prices…the colors like these ice cream vendors in Bahia serving our last coastal real estate tour.

Bahia-Ecuador-workers

Plus we love the warm weather.

This is the final point. I was in a West Jefferson barber shop today and read the local paper.  This is as small town USA as you can get. Nine people were on the front page…all arrested for dealing drugs…cocaine…heroine…meths.  Then Merri saw a real live mountain lion run across our field. Then we visited our neighbor who showed us photos of five bears roaming the neighborhood.  I feel totally safe here and would not hesitate for a moment to invite people to come up (just watch the ice on the road).

So I can live in complete safety here…even though there is crime…in this.

snow

Or go to Cotacachi and San Clemente where the crime may be about the same…more or less…but in this.

Ecuador beach

and this

cotacachi-sun

at about a fourth or fifth the price.

So here is the salesman speaking. “Visit us in Ecuador. You will be glad you did!”

Here is a comment from a delegate at our last course:

Hi Merri:  I just wanted to drop you a note and let you know how much myself and all of our “extended family” enjoyed the course that you, Gary, and all of your competent staff put on earlier this month.  I am really just getting my feet back on the ground and I think that we are finally there.

Gary was awesome as we expected and gave me as really a beginning investor many insights and new ideas to think about.  I am speaking for myself, Charles, Jose as well as Rebecca and Betty who joined us after the Galapagos Islands.  You showed me that you are an expert planner and really went  out of your way to accommodate  us especially when we had people coming in at different times.

Francisco stood out as well.  Of course, “our man” Steve the excellent tour guide and all around helpful person.  Last and not least was Ray who also handled so much on the fly and did it well.
Ray really helped with the leaving process.  Also I will keep in touch with him about the possible medical conference I may put on at La Mirage 2010 in August if it comes together…..lots of work and much to work on to make it happen.  We really enjoyed your hotel and the hospitality.  It was  memorable. Thanks so much and we hope to keep in touch and continue with Gary’s newsletters!  Merry Christmas and Happy Holidays.
Sincerely, Jim

Merri and I hope to serve you in Ecuador this sunny winter.

Gary

Jan. 16-21 Ecuador Spanish Course

Jan. 22-23 Imbabura Real Estate Tour

Jan. 24-27 Coastal Real Estate Tour

Feb. 9-11 Beyond Logic-Shamanic Mingo

Feb. 13-15 International Business & Investing Made EZ

Feb. 16-17 Imbabura Real Estate Tour

March 8-9 Imbabura Real Estate Tour

March 10-15 Ecuador Export Expedition

March 16-19 Coastal Real Estate Tour

Better still join us all year in Ecuador! See our entire schedule of 26 courses, tours, mingos and expeditions we’ll conduct in 2009.

The course fee includes meeting at Quito airport (day before the course)…transportation (by group bus) to Cotacachi and back to Quito. Course fee does not include air are. accommodations, food or individual transportation.

Cotacachi Food


Cotacachi Ecuador food always surprises those who visit Cotacachi for the first time.

Ecuadorians are noted as among the longest lived people on earth. This is, in part, from Andean foods and nutritional habits that began long ago. Since ancient times Andean Yatchaks, Shamans and Curanderos have taught healthy living supported by good nutrition. They based these healthy lifestyles on three ideals; clean food, good food combinations and a correct fat, carbohydrate and protein balance.

One reason Cotacachi food is so good is that it is so fresh!

Cotacachi-food-market

Cotacachi food is really inexpensive too.

Our seafood in Cotacachi is fresh brought right from the coast.

Cotacachi-fresh-seafood

Here we are with our chef Santiago after buying seafood from the Ibarra market.

Our restaurant in Cotacachi the Quinoa Cafe celebrates the wisdom of the past and combines it with the unity of mankind. We continually serve fresh fruit…at coffee breaks.

Cotacachi-fresh-food-flowers

Fresh Cotacachi fruit starts breakfast as well.

Cotacachi-fresh-food-breakfast

Quinoa Cafe’s core bill of fare is Quinoa, often referred to as the Andean grain, a wonderful food, native to the Andes. Quinoa sustained the ancient Incas and has been grown continuously for over 5,000 years. The plant thrives in poor soil, and the high mountain terrain of South America’s Andes.

Qunioa has been described as the super grain. Actually it is the SEED of a leafy plant that’s related to spinach. What makes quinoa special is that it has a very high protein content, more than any single grain. Plus unlike grain, Quinoa has the amino acid lysine, so the protein is complete. The World Health Organization ranks quinoa protein equivalent to milk. Quinoa offers more iron than grains and contains magnesium, zinc, copper, manganese, potassium, riboflavin, thiamin, B vitamins: B6, niacin, magnesium, zinc, copper. It is also a good source of folate (folic acid).

Quinoa is delicious and can be substituted for almost any other grain.

Here is our chef Santiago serving a quinoa cake…sweet and delicious but protein filled.

Cotacachi-fresh-food-qunioa cake

Even our coffee breaks are healthy…fresh strawberries…gooseberries…and fresh ground coconut covered in organic chocolate.

Cotacachi-fresh-food-fruit

We will feature Quinoa and Andean nutrition at the August weekend course at our Blue Ridge farm conducted by our business intuitive, Susan Stanton Rotman. Seven Andean nutritional secrets are shared below.

First let me say more about the course.

The course is entitled, “Escaping the Tryanny of Reason: Intuitive Development for Practical and Business Decision Making” This seminar will introduce you to working with your own intuition to develop greater insight, creativity, and more informed decision-making and problem solving skills, all important elements for greater success.

The course will examine intuition in the business context, the use of intuitive process as a complement to rational decision-making, and the integration of intuitive knowing with analytical thought. Susan will present the basic concepts of intuitive knowing and its development, including how to access your own intuition, and skill building to evaluate, process, trust and apply your information.

She will help you explore the experience of intuition and its forms, including exercises to develop sensitivity and to practice using intuition as a navigational tool.

Merri and I have found that escaping the tyranny of reason helps us greatly when faced with questions that cannot be humanly answered. We have several weapons in our information processing armory. One of the great assets is Susan, a professional business intuitive. She consults with businesses and individuals using both her clairvoyance and other psychic abilities combined with her rational skills to help people and businesses with decision making and navigation. She consults with clients from around the world. Susan does not really like the word psychic (nor do Merri or I) as a lot of the information she comes up with does not just pop out of the air.

She has a strong educational, legal and business background. Susan originally trained as a corporate attorney and mediator.

Susan is a Phi Beta Kappa graduate of Georgetown University, having received a Bachelor of Science in Foreign Service in 1977, cum laude, and graduated from Georgetown University Law Center in 1981.

She practiced corporate law for many years and has extensive experience representing both individual and corporate clients.

She also understands business from the entrepreneurial side—she owned her own retail art-jewelry business and is an expert in pearls

Susan has a broad background in esoteric and metaphysical studies, spirituality, and personal, business, and family development practices.

This course will be conducted Friday, Saturday and Sunday August 15, 16 and 17, 2008 at our Blue Ridge Farm.

All meals and accommodations ARE included and the food will be special.

A lot of stress comes from poor nutrition. Quinoa offers an optional, delicious purifying and the diet you will enjoy at the farm can enhance your rest and boost your energy and heath as well as reduce your weight without any feelings of giving up or not enjoying your food.

The nutritional goals at the course are to provide a delicious menu that improves digestion, reduces weight, increases energy, reduces toxicity in the system and balances the hormonal system so cravings and excessive hunger disappear. This system is based on shamanic nutritional ideals taught to Merri and me, when we with Andean Yatchaks and indigenous communities.

The cornerstones of the Andean nutritional program are:

#1: Eating a balance of fat, carbohydrates and protein.

#2: Eating combinations of food for ideal digestion.

#3: Eating clean organic food prepared and served by happy, joyful people.

#4: Eating in good spirits at the right times.

#5: Chewing in the correct way.

#6: Eating purifying and satisfying meals.

#7: Balancing nutritional with correct sleep and exercise.

Here is what we will review about nutrition during the intuition course.

#1: Eating a balance of fat, carbohydrates and protein.

Our diet keeps protein balance without excessive amounts of meat using quinoa, eggs, cheese and yoghurt instead. A great deal of poor health and stress is tied in to the underlying hormonal disturbance caused by the excess production of insulin. This imbalance normally comes from too much food and incorrect protein, carbohydrate, fat balances in the diet. Every time we eat, hormones in our body will change, either good or bad. Delicious food with a balance of 3 parts carbohydrates, two parts protein and one part fat has the power to orchestrate beneficial hormonal changes in our body.

#2: Eating the correct combinations of food for ideal digestion.

Andean nutritional ideals also focus on combining foods in a way that avoid fermentation in the stomach. Foods and spices are divided into three types neutral, savory and sweet. Neutral can be mixed with savory or sweet, but no savory and sweet foods are mixed. The main neutral foods are grains, cereals, nuts and seeds. Meat and most vegetables are savory. Fruits are sweet. Cereals are ground and soaked to improve their digestibility. Sweet spices include cinnamon, nutmeg, allspice, ginger, mint. Savory spices include sale, pepper, chiles, oregano, corriander, bay leaf, cumin, saffron, fennel. No two fats are mixed nor are fruit types.

#3 & 4: Eating clean organic food prepared and served by happy, joyful people and eat in good spirits at the right times. Food should be beautiful as well…like this feta salad served at our last course.

feta-cheese-salad

We even make breakfast look good!

Cotacachi-fresh-food-breakfast

Candace Pert, Ph.D., is a neuroscientist who was awarded a Nobel prize for her groundbreaking work that shows the mind is not just in the brain but in the entire body. The mind and body communicate using the chemistry of emotion. Short chains of amino acids called peptides and receptors are found in the brain, stomach, muscles, glands and all major organs. They send messages back and forth linking mind and body. When we are happy our entire body is happy and reverse and this chemistry has a dramatic impact on our food and digestion.

Andean beliefs view the body composed of three elements earth (Pacha mama), fire (Taita Inti) and air Pacha Kuti.

There are times of the day when each of these elements are most active. The digestive fires are highest at 12 noon, so a savory meal is normally eaten at this time.

A sweet breakfast accommodates a more sluggish digestive time and the evening is set aside for a purifying fruit meal so the body can use the midnight fire energy to cleanse rather than digest.

Three herbal teas are served. In the morning cinnamon tea is served. Before lunch ginger tea lights the digestive fires and before sleep chamomile tea enhances a good night’s rest.

Part of good nutrition comes from eating, sleeping and exercising at the correct times.

The yatchaks also suggest we eat only when hungry and the stomach is empty so we recommend eating only every four hours. For cravings between herbal tea is best and juices can be added if it is uncomfortable to wait for the next meal.

#5: Chewing in the correct way.

Correct chewing releases nutrient molecules so energy from food is more quickly released and assimilated. This allows the brain to recognize flavors and release the correct digestive juices for that food. Proper chewing does even more because it stimulates the bodies sphincter (or ring) muscles that surround the various orifices of the body.

Ring muscles include the muscles around the eyes, the nostrils, anus, urethra, genitals and the mouth. In a healthy body, all sphincters work together, contracting and relaxing simultaneously. They also activate the respiratory system, the gastrointestinal system, the circulatory system, the lymphatic system, the musculoskeletal system and the urogenital system. Ring muscles are ultimately responsible for putting all the other muscles and all the organs of the body to work.

Chewing correctly stimulates the ring muscles and consequently helps exercise all our muscles.

#6: Eating Purifying and satisfying meals.

Fruit types also exist and are never mixed. Citrus stands together, but is not mixed with other foods. Watery fruits (apples pears, plums and grapes) can be mixed. Bananas are eaten alone only or with dairy only. Pineapple and melons are also eaten alone.

There are three purifying meals we will learn about during the course. The first most gentle purifier is a water combination of apples and grapes. The second meal is an entire pineapple and the third, an entire watermelon.

Organic coffee, tea and cocoa are great purifiers rich in antioxidants. Coffee and some tea is avoided by those who do not want caffeine. We recommend moderation and serve only organic, fair trade coffee and tea Coffee and tea (without milk) are neutral and can be consumed before or with any meal. I will be bring organic coffee with me from Ecuador for the course.

Finally we provide an Andean cleansing tea made from cinnamon, sweet pepper and chamomile.

#7: Balancing nutritional with exercise and sleep.

Each day you can learn a gentle but profound exercise that will enhance your stress release. We do not have television at the farm and recommend going to bed before the evening fore cycle begins at 10 PM. The farm is totally quiet and dark for more restful sleep.

We are pleased that Susan will be with us. She will present two days of group instruction and workshop plus will provide individual consultations after the seminar concludes (a consultation is included as part of the course). Individual consultations may be in person on August 17 or by telephone at a later date.

To enroll, enjoy the farm and learn more about nutrition

To enroll for two

Learn more about the farm and accommodations

Learn more about Cotacachi food at Cotacachi Stores – Supermarket