Tag Archive | "Missouri"

Ecuador Retirement Lifestyle Shift


Retirement in Ecuador can shift lifestyle towards simplicity.

In a moment, let’s look at the current way to earn more income with greater safety for retirement, in Ecuador or anywhere, for now or for future retirement.

First, let’s look at how many North Americans are learning to make whatever income they have go farther… with simplicity.

When you retire in Ecuador one great benefit is being surrounded by a culture that understands and lives simply.

There are many simply pleasures in Ecuador like…

retire in Ecuador

Don’t get me wrong.  You can enjoy  luxuries when you live or retire in Ecuador.

This excerpt from a recent article at Ecuador Living entitled “Retire in Ecuador Guide – Communications” shows how to eliminate long distance telephone charges in Ecuador:

When you retire in Ecuador enjoy new but different luxuries. Luxury differs in every culture and country. For example in Ecuador, tile roofs, hardwood and ceramic floor tiles  (luxuries in North America) are low cost, standard building supplies.

A regular maid, to do dishes and laundry, costs little.

Yet washing machines and dishwashers are expensive luxuries in Ecuador.

Cars cost a lot in Ecuador.  Cabs and drivers with their own cars are cheap because personal cars have a high duty.   Commercial vehicles can be imported into Ecuador without tax.

People who couldn’t afford housekeepers or gardeners in North America can do so when they live or retire in Ecuador.

Take time to understand the system and compare costs before setting your lifestyle. Hold off on the big fridge. This will cost a lot.  A maid buying fresh food in the market every day creates employment and costs less!

Read all of  Retire in Ecuador Guide – Communications

retire in Ecuador A simple Ecuador pleasure is the good humor man on the waterfront.

Excerpts from a recent USA TODAY article  for Boomers, recession is redefining retirement  by Christine Dugas, explains more:

Life changes are becoming a focus, along with retirement-expectation changes.

“People are stepping back and asking themselves truly, ‘How much is enough?’ ” says Sheryl Garrett, a financial planner in Kansas City, Mo. It’s more of a movement to simple living than just a temporary spending cutback. “People are taking ownership of what they can control.”

Many Boomers are so busy dealing with their daily lives, from monthly bills and vacation plans, to doctor appointments and children’s college hopes, that they seldom considered their futures. And they often believe that life sort of ends with retirement.

The financial crisis has forced them to look ahead. In reality, they will live much longer and be healthier than their parents’ generation. And retirement may be filled with much more than playing golf or cards.

Retirees get married, they move, and some even have children, says James Richardson, a financial planner in Raleigh, N.C.

“In many cases, people feel more productive if they continue to work during retirement,” he says. “That was true even before the financial crisis.”

“We have to look at retirement differently,” she says. “They always say that if you are going to work in retirement, do the things that you love to do. So I’m not going to complain. I love teaching.”

Baby Boomers such as Neilson may change retirement. “They may re-create themselves so that they can do something that is productive and still earn a paycheck,” Garrett says.

People are not living on an extraordinary gravy train, he says, and they can’t use their houses as ATMs any longer. And they can’t count on buying a new refrigerator just because they want one, as opposed to when they need one.

See more on this at Wild Health & Profit.

retire in Ecuador

A simple Ecuador pleasure is a just caught fresh from the sea….fish for a dollar.

If you are planning a simpler life, you may want to consider retiring in Ecuador.

Create Extra Investment Income the Simple Way

If you plan to retire in Ecuador or are saving for a later retirement, you’ll want to increase profit and safety.

This is possible even in the recession because for the first six months of 2009 JGAM’s low risk strategy has been their best performing strategy.  With a 100% loan their low risk portfolio has risen 11.4% or at a 23% per annum rate.

Here is an excerpt from our latest multi currency lesson:

JGAM believes that this low risk strategy will remain productive for the rest of 2009 for several reasons.

First they do not believe that the economic recession is over yet.  JGAM expects the turnaround to be L-shaped (not V-shaped). This means economic growth is not expected to return to normal levels in a foreseeable time.

This economic stall creates a lack of growth that will limit corporate earnings potential and keep inflation in check.

A slow economy, without inflation, favors bonds and leaves equities at risk.   JGAM does not expect inflation to be a real threat in the near future.

Short term rates are also likely to be kept artificially low by governments to help the banking industry.   Banks are making huge profits by paying low rates on client deposits and lending the funds at higher long term rates.

Here is an example of how leveraged bonds work. Two bonds available now are:

US$ 5% Korean Electric Power  (A rated ) due 17 – 01 – 2017 paying a yield of  5.05%

GBP 5% Rep. of Hungary due 06 – 05 – 2014 price paying a yield of 10%.

Assume an investment of $100,000 in each bond… from a $100,000 investment plus a $100,000 US dollar loan at 2.75%.

The average yield per annum is 7.52% or $15,050, less $2,750 loan costs.

That leaves a $12,300 return or 12.3% per annum instead of a 7.52% return on an unleveraged $100,000 investment.

Both managed and advisory clients with JGAM can invest in a leveraged low risk portfolio but managed portfolios can obtain the greatest advantage of the strategy.

The two benefits of a managed portfolio are JGAM’s active monitoring make international investing simple plus gives the ability to invest in a wide range of global securities that are not available for most advisory clients.

Americans who live in the US but have advisory accounts cannot buy most overseas bonds.  US advisory clients who live outside the US can buy these bonds.

You can get more information from Thomas Fischer at JGAM. His email address is fischer@jgam.com

Enroll in our Multi Currency Course here

Gary

Join Merri, Thomas Fischer of JGAM and me in North Carolina this July and enroll in our multi currency course free. Save $175.

Learn more about early retirement and Ecuador.

July 24-26 IBEZ North Carolina

Oct. 9-11 IBEZ North Carolina

Or join us in Ecuador and learn more about living and retiring in Ecuador.

July 24-26 IBEZ North Carolina

Oct. 9-11 IBEZ North Carolina

Or join us in Ecuador and learn more about living and retiring in Ecuador.

Sept. 17-21 Ecuador Spanish Course
Sept. 23-24 Imbabura Real Estate Tour
Sept. 25-28 Ecuador Coastal Real Estate Tour

Oct. 21-24 Ecuador Import Export Tour

Nov. 6-8 IBEZ Ecuador
Nov. 9-10 Imbabura Real Estate Tour
Nov. 11-14 Ecuador Coastal Real Estate Tour

Read the entire USA TODAY article For Boomers, recession is redefining retirement at www.usatoday.com/money/perfi/retirement/2009-06-16-retirement-boomers-recession_N.htm

Economic Labyrinth


Follow the money three words that form an economic labyrinth and have the potential to destroy the world.

Actually those words create an economic maze not a labyrinth.

Labyrinths are often confused with mazes, but a maze is a  puzzle that confuses the path and direction; Labyrinths have only a single path to the center that are unambiguous ways to the center and back. Labyrinths are not designed to be difficult to navigate.

The Western economic model of working mainly for money to have lots of things and to eventually retire is flawed.

So too is the social concept that having more is better.

The combination of these flaws have hurt the environment…perhaps badly…not to mention our social order.

Now the entire concept is falling apart because bigger is not better.

Correcting this will create some fortunes for those who see ahead.

Environmental investing is one area that is and will continue to prosper.

Shifting China and the US to European/Japanese conceptual models of “smaller is better” will help as well.

A July 7, 2008 USA Today article entitled “New cars will skimp on fuel but not on amenities” by Sharon Silke Carty gives an example when it says: “Automakers are working as fast as they can to meet a new consumer landscape: Buyers want not just fuel-efficient cars but also the same amenities they had in their hulking SUVs.

“It’s a change from how most cars have been set up in the USA.

“If gas prices stay high and demand remains strong for smaller engines, auto executives say the U.S. market will start looking more like Europe’s, where what is considered a small car here is seen as a family sedan.

“People are starting to look at their four-cylinder cars like they did their luxury cars, with leather seats and creature comforts,” says Mike DiGiovanni, General Motors’ executive director of global market analysis. ‘Think about this: The price of fuel in Europe is $7 a gallon, and the industry has survived nicely with smaller vehicles that are loaded up.'”

Automakers that shift fastest to this euro model will clean up.

One way to prosper is to look at how crowded Europe and even more crowded Japan deal with the different supply and demand. The US, Canada, Australia and China all have learned to squander having huge natural resources and space.

No more.

However there is another flaw in the relation to work, fulfillment and living. The idea of having the biggest house on the bloc and “he who has the most toys wins” isn’t working so well anymore.

Bonsai is an example, a Chinese invention that became big in Japan…perfect for limited resources and space.

The Japanese rock or Zen garden, often small, containing sand, gravel, rocks, and occasionally grass and/or other natural elements, with the sea symbolized not by water but by sand raked in patterns that suggest rippling water. Compare this with the large water consuming grass lawn requiring plenty of gasoline to mow.

The Japanese tea ceremony is another…lots of pleasure from limited resource expenditure.

Global shifts in resource supply and demand are creating new lifestyles via economic crisis that will bring a post consumer society.

This shift will be easier than most realize because it is human nature to feel best when working with a sense of purpose. Current shifts are so profound that societies will have to live more purposeful lives.

We try to watch for, adapt to and reflect these shifts in everything we do in our work, play, business and social interactions.

Yet it is not always easy to change after 61 years of doing things one way!

This is why we are busy here at the farm making a number of changes. One was to enhance our labyrinth.

The history of labyrinths dates back into the mists of time, but their religious and spiritual aspects became most noted during the twelfth and thirteenth centuries when many Christian gothic cathedrals installed them in England, Italy and France.

Labyrinths help connect the spiritual side of consciousness in a physical way.

Walking or tracing a labyrinth unites the physical with the spiritual. It brings the inner spiritual life into the outer physical world. We operate in a more holistic way when these inner and outer worlds are united.

Labyrinths represent an easy to follow series of twists and turns from the outer to the inner and back..200% of life, in spirit and material wealth.

Environmentally speaking, labyrinths are great places for exercise as well. They provide the longest amount of walking in the smallest possible space.

We have had a seven circuit classic labyrinth carved in one of our upper, hidden meadows for a numbers of years, but it had grown a bit worn and the meadow overgrown

So Richard and I jumped in my 22 year old Suzuki Samari and headed to the meadow.

samari

We cleaned up.

old labyrinth

Then we called our friend of decades, Chuck Hunner, a master labyrinth builder who had laid out this labyrinth in the first place.

Chuck drove up from his home in Asheville and the three of us enhanced this labyrinth…a lot…including with another good and essential friend John (Deere) putting a heavy stelae in the center.

stellae

The labyrinth is beginning to look better!

labyrinth-taking-shape

You can see the entire process and many pictures of our Merrily Farms Labyrinth being created in Chuck’s Labyrinth Journal.

Chuck is a craftsman with 38 years of experience making art with his hands. For the last 10 years he’s made labyrinths.

His ‘career’ in labyrinth making started when Richard Anderson taught him to
scratch the labyrinth pattern on the beach. The first time Chuck walked into
the pattern he immediately felt the same effect that 15 minutes of deep
meditation gave him.

He makes labyrinths because he knows that they can influence the way people think and feel…this has been for hundreds of years. Walking a labyrinth automatically balances and enhances the way we think. Labyrinth walkers report feeling calm, clear headed and focused. Some experience a catharsis moving old emotions out so that they can see new solutions to the confines of their past. Breakthroughs are almost automatic.

Chuck says he loves labyrinths because they free up his own creative process. A long walk in this small space gets the creative juices flowing and allows new ideas to bubble up into awareness. Ideas come and make life better.

Man working with the environment. Logic uniting with intuition. Work becoming part of play.

There is huge change coming. The change is good. Understanding and adapting to it can help bring profits and help make life better as well.

Gary

Join us and stay at our farm. Enjoy the mountain cool and summer views as you learn.

Or sit at our waterfall.

waterfall

Walk the labyrinth with us during Susan Rotman’s business intuition course.

Or walk the Labyrinth during the splendor of the Blue Ridge leaf change as you learn at our October 3-5, International Business and Investing Made EZ North Carlolina Course.
Labyrinths…lots of walk…little space…uniting the mind, body and emotion. They are springing up all over the US …another sign of how the Western world is changing.

You can see many permanent labyrinths in hospitals, churches and schools near you. Chuck Hunner has helped create many. Try a long walk in a small space.

Labyrinths are another sign of how Western concepts are changing.

Here is a list of Labyrinths that Chuck as worked on in the past few years.

Yanney Park, Kearney, Nebraska
Memphis, Tennessee Cancer Survivors’ Park
Intermountain Medical Center, Murray, Utah.
Lafayette Orinda Presbyterian Church, Lafayette, California.
Trinity United Methodist Church, Ruston, Louisiana.
Labyrinth at Bright School, Chattanooga, Tennessee
Marianjoy Rehabilitation Hospital in Wheaton, Illinois
First United Methodist Church of Ventura, California
First Presbyterian Church, Livermore, California
Central Park Labyrinth, Burlington, Ontario,Canada.
University of Redlands, Redlands, California.
All Saints Cemetery, Salina, Kansas.
Boone Medical Center, Columbia, Missouri..
Church of the Good Shepard, Augusta, Georgia.
Maxey-Gregg Cancer Survivor Park, Columbia, South Carolina.
Trinity Episcopal Church, Santa Barbara, California.
St. Dominics, Houston, Texas.
Danville Labyrinth Project, Danville, Kentucky.
Kanuga Conference Center near Hendersonville, North Carolina.
Dolores, Colorado – Sophia Retreat Center

See pictures of these labyrinths