Tag Archive | "Kansas"

Green International Investments in a EMP Terrorist Attack


Green international investments can help investors prosper due to the threat of an EMP terrorist attack.

Tuesday’s message at this site saw seven steps that could help us survive and prosper in a new era that could unfold due to a terrorist EMP attack.

Yesterday’s message looked at the importance of securing food in an EMP terrorist attack.

This threat of a terrorist EMP attack could accelerate opportunity in green international investments.

We’ll look at these in a minute… plus some Ecuador real estate plus how the risk of  a energy grid shut down could accelerate green investments.

First… let me reiterate… I do not think the sky is falling.  The sun always shines somewhere and the grass is not always greener on the other side of the fence.  God…Nature or whatever you wish to call your Higher Being always takes care of us. 

May I quote a wonderful passage about this from  John James Ingalls (a Senator from Kansas 1873 to 1891), address in “In Praise of Blue Grass.”

Grass is the forgiveness of nature–her constant benediction.  Fields trampled with battle, saturated with blood, torn with the ruts of cannon, grow green again with grass, and carnage is forgotten.  Streets abandoned by traffic become grass-grown like rural lanes, and are obliterated.  Forests decay, harvests perish, flowers vanish, but grass is immortal.  Beleaguered by the sullen hosts of winter, it withdraws into the impregnable fortress of its subterranean vitality, and emerges upon the first solicitation of Spring.  Sown by the winds, by wandering birds, propagated by the subtle horticulture of the elements which are its ministers and servants, it softens the rude outline of the world.  Its tenacious fibres hold the earth in its place, and prevent its soluble components from washing into the wasting sea.  It invades the solitude of deserts, climbs the inaccessible slopes and forbidding pinnacles of mountains, modifies climates, and determines the history, character, and destiny of nations.  Unobtrusive and patient, it has immortal vigor and aggression.  Banished from the thoroughfare and the field, it bides its time to return, and when vigilance is relaxed, or the dynasty has perished, it silently resumes the throne from which it has been expelled, but which it never abdicates.  It bears no blazonry or bloom to charm the senses with fragrance or splendor, but its homely hue is more enchanting than the lily or the rose.  It yields no fruit in earth or air, and yet should its harvest fail for a single year, famine would depopulate the world.

Our horses here at our Blue Ridge farm really believe this.

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They are allowed to roam the farm freely except in our front yard.  But once a year, in the autumn, we let them in.

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They crop and fertilize the lawn. This makes the horses really happy.

They love chomping, lying, rolling and sleeping in the grass.

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Play in the grass

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Blaze, the oldest, relaxes so much that when I sent this picture to our grandson Garren, he panicked thinking that Blaze was dead.

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He’s not. Up he came…

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On the subject of international investing and grass. I finally received my new Neuton weed eater.

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This is a neat machine.

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I have been using a Neuton electric lawn mower and when I ordered this weed eater they were 1,500 orders behind!

This shows the demand for green products.

Neuton says at its website: We are dedicated to making the world’s most innovative and dependable battery-powered lawn and garden equipment for people who care about the maintenance of their properties and the health of our environment.  Our forward-thinking designs reduce the noise and pollution of traditional gas power equipment, making yard work more enjoyable. Consistent with these goals, a portion of our profits are donated to community organizations working to clean our air.

Using innovative designs in rechargeable, battery-powered products we¹re developing unique and reliable tools that are easy to use and are easy on the environment. And together with our customers, we¹re redefining the way people care for their properties.

Designed in Vermont

Neuton battery-powered mowers are a reflection of the simplicity, ingenuity and values that define Vermont. At their core, Neuton battery-powered mowers are:

* Hard working – providing high powered cutting capacity with professional results
* Simple – delivering an ease of use and storage you won’t find elsewhere
* Responsible – exhibiting a profound respect for the environment

* A cleaner and more efficient way to mow your lawn. In fact, Forbes magazine recently rated Vermont the number one “Greenest State.”

Neuton and the Environment
Neuton battery-powered mowers are the #1 selling battery-powered mowers on the planet. Our belief in the environmental benefits of Neuton is a strong one. We call it our Clean Air Initiative.

Since we started, we have subsidized the purchase of thousands of Neutons across America in exchange for dirty/gas-guzzling mowers. In Southern California alone, 16,000 residents have replaced their mowers with Neutons. The result has been a staggering emissions reduction of 600 tons per year.

And with Neuton, reducing environmental impact extends even further.  The Noise Pollution Clearinghouse rated Neuton the quietest rotary mower you can buy.

The bottom line is you get big-time results, while leaving behind a small environmental footprint.

Neuton’s success shows the potential for green products.  The threat of an EMP terrorist attack has the potential to accelerate the value of green investments because it could shut down North America’s national energy grid.  Tis may speed up the development and use of individual energy systems.

Neuton is not a public company so we cannot buy shares, but tomorrow’s message looks at how to take advantage of good international green opportunity.

The risk of an EMP attack also accelerates demand for Ecuador real estate.

See for example how this sloping 10 acre corn field with outstanding 360 degree views, offers extra opportunity at Cotacachi real estate tours.

cotacachi-real-estate

Gary

Let’s share ways and lifestyle alterations that protect as they provide joy, satisfaction, better health and enhanced wealth.

You may not be able to (or want) to move your home abroad or to a rural area.   Yet gardening, even in urban areas,  can be healthy and fun.  Holding some precious metals is probably a good investment anyway.  We should be taking care of our health even when their is no threat of war.

When it comes to holding assets abroad… our multi currency course can help.

Nov. 9-10 Imbabura Real Estate Tour

Nov. 11-14 Ecuador Coastal Real Estate Tour

December 6-8 Blaine Watson’s  Beyond Logic & Shamanic Tour

December 9-10 Imbabura Real Estate Tour

December 11-13 Ecuador Coastal Real Estate Tour

Join us in 2010.   Attend more than one seminar and tour and save even more plus get the three emailed courses free.

Our multi seminar-tour discounts have grown!  See the 2010 winter schedule below.  To Enroll click below.

1 real estate tour  $499 Couple $749

2 seminar courses & tours $949 Couple  $1,399

3 seminar courses & tours   $1199 Couple  $1,749

4 seminar courses & tours   $1,399 Couple $2,149

5 seminar courses & tours  $1,599 Couple $2,499

(Be sure to show in the comments section which courses and tours you are attending)

International Club attend up to 52 courses and tours in 2010 free.

Jan.   8-11     Ecuador Export Tour ($499) Couple $749
Jan. 13-14     Imbabura Real Estate Tour
Jan. 16-17     Coastal Real Estate Tour
Jan. 19-20    Quito-Mindo Real Estate Tour
Jan. 22-23    Cuenca Real Estate Tour

Feb. 11-14   Quantum Wealth Florida -International Investing & Internet Business, Mt. Dora, Florida ($749) Couple $999
Feb. 15-16   Travel to Quito and Andes
Feb  17-18   Imbabura Real Estate Tour
Feb. 20-21  Coastal Real Estate Tour
Feb. 23-24  Quito-Mindo Real Estate Tour
Feb. 26-27  Cuenca Real Estate Tour

Mar. 11-14     Super Thinking + Spanish Course, Mt. Dora, Florida ($749) Couple $999
Mar. 15-16    Travel to Quito and Andes
Mar. 17-18     Imbabura Real Estate Tour
Mar. 19-20    Cotacachi Shamanic Tour
Mar. 22-23    Coastal Real Estate Tour
Mar. 25-26    Cuenca Real Estate Tour

See our entire 2010 seminar and tour schedule here

See Neuton’s website here

Economic Safety in Troubled Times


Learn about economic safety in Ecuador, the Blue Ridge and North Dakota.

These troubled economic times create wonderful, investment opportunity. The corrections in the stock market and depressed real estate prices combined with global inflationary pressures are developing a lush field of investing values.

Yet investors looking for economic safety need to exercise care in how they harvest this financial crop.

Troubled times create distortions. Distortions create problems. Problems create opportunity. Opportunity creates economic safety and financial profit, if you look carefully for value and make sure your liquidity remains safe during the search.

This is one reason why Merri and I love Ecuador. The people are peace loving. The people are independant. Ecuador’s population have a history of caring for themselves. They know how to farm. The food supply is abundant. Ecuador is oil rich. Ecuadorians do not have the expectation that the government should supply their every want, need and desire. There is less likely to be violent civil unrest in troubled times.

Here in the Blue Ridge there is also a history and connection to independence. Heating and food is plentiful. People know how to survive tough times.

One great pleasure in our International Investment and Business Courses are the people we meet and friends made. People always enjoy each other. Merri and I do as well. Some delegates have been coming to our courses for decades, so we were delighted at our course last weekend when one delegate and good friend from North Dakota who has attended many times over the past 20 years was with us.

He told me a some things about North Dakota that started me quickly searching.

First, the Bank of North Dakota, located in Bismarck, ND, is the only state-owned bank in the nation. The bank has over $160 million in capital and is in partnership with over 100 other North Dakota financial institutions. More important because the bank is owned by the state, it has a credit rating of AA.

The main deposit base of the bank is the state itself. Sate law requires all state funds and funds of state institutions to be deposited there. However deposits are accepted from any source, including private citizens.

The bank is not a member of the Federal Depository Insurance Corporation. The State of North Dakota guarantees all deposits regardless of amount (over $100,0000) in the bank. So this is quite a safe place to hold liquid funds.

Do not expect free irons, dinner plates or special incentives to open accounts. Though individuals can open accounts at the bank, this is not the main business so it offers fewer retail services than most commercial banks. The bank only has one office and does not try to compete in consumer banking.

So, how good is the guarantee of the State of North Dakota?

According to an October 7 2008 article at KXMCTV in Minot, North Dakota, the
state has a pile of money. North Dakota is one of the few states with a budget surplus, estimated at a billion dollars.

The state also has some good economic fundamentals. First it is rich in agriculture, beef cattle, milk, hogs and honey producers rank North Dakota among the leading producers.

Wheat is the leading farm product in North Dakota, ranking second in production only behind Kansas. North Dakota grows more durum wheat (used for pasta) than any other state.

North Dakota also leads all other states in the production of barley and sunflower seeds and is a leader in the production of flaxseed (linseed oil).

North Dakota is among the leading states in the production of canola seed, honey, navy beans, oats, pinto beans, rye, soybeans and sugar beets.

Hay is important, grown for livestock feed.

That bodes well for the state in inflationary times…but there is more…energy.

Just beneath its surface North Dakota has a 1,000-year supply of coal. The third largest gasification plant in the world is here. This is the only commercial-scale coal gasification plant in the United States. North Dakota power plants have 4.5 gigawatts of electric generating capacity and are some of the most efficient and reliable in the nation. Energy, real estate costs and taxes are some of the lowest in the country.

Then there is oil. North Dakota has a lot of it. Brigham Exploration Company alone says discoveries suggest 42 million to 71 million barrels of oil.

Brigham shares sell on Nasdaq under the code BEXP.

North Dakota could become one of America’s leaders in energy production. The state has near limitless supply of coal, incredible potential for wind, ethanol and biodiesel production, and increasingly productive oil fields.

Congress has extended several renewable energy tax credits for wind and biodiesel projects, small ethanol and biodiesel producers that will help North Dakota’s economy.

North Dakota is the sixth-largest energy producing and exporting state and has more potential for renewable energy growth.

According to North Dakota’s Department of Energy’s Wind Energy Program, “North Dakota has the potential to supply 36% of the electricity of the lower 48 states through its wind supply alone.” Wind development in North Dakota is taking off, over the past year throughout the state.

North Dakota’s Senator Kent Conrad recently met with T. Boone Pickens as he has developed a New Energy Reform Act, which includes some of Picken’s ideas. The Pickens plan aims to reduce dependence on oil by increasing the amount of clean energy like wind power and solar power.

An ABC news article entitled, “The Backyard Economy: North Dakota
A Look at the Peace Garden State’s Economic Issues” by Christine Byun says:

“Surging commodity prices and a weaker dollar have enhanced North Dakota’s economic strength, leading to stronger growth and continued investment throughout the state.

‘The chances of a state recession are incredibly low,’ said David Flynn, an economist at the University of North Dakota. ‘The most likely scenario would be for North Dakota to continue to grow.’ State Fiscal Management Director Sheila Peterson said state revenues are 13 percent ahead of forecasts, which she partially attributes to ‘solid growth’ in the tourism, energy and agriculture sectors. The state’s bountiful crops play a big part of its exports; agricultural products pulled about $170 million into North Dakota in 2006. Last year, the state’s fertile farmlands produced the most wheat and barley in the nation, according to the United States Department of Agriculture.

North Dakota is not solely dependent on agriculture. It also exports machinery and crude oil products. The energy industry — both oil and alternative sources — is expanding, according to state labor market analyst Kevin Iverson. The natural resources and mining sector added 4,000 jobs to their payrolls since last March.

“Oil is an absolutely booming industry in the state,” Iverson said, noting that the western portion of the state has benefited as companies direct their attention to the Bakken rock formation as a potential oil reservoir.

“The dollar’s declining value to foreign currencies has is also spurring economic activity in North Dakota. While the state sells almost half its exports to Canada, savvy shoppers from north of the border are crossing in to Grand Forks and Minot to take advantage of what are essentially reduced prices for them and in the process, driving up retail trade.

“A potential weak spot for North Dakota is the state’s lower than average unemployment rate. Economists worry with fewer people looking for work, companies interested in doing business in North Dakota could potentially bypass the state because of the tight labor market and lack of available workers.”

Bank of North Dakota’s website is www.banknd.com

There you have it…places that may be safer than most…places that may offer more opportunity and economic safety in troubled times.

Gary

Learn more about economic safety this November.  Join Merri, me, Steve, Kjetil Haugan and Peter Conradsen of Jyske Global Asset Management in Cotacachi Ecuador. We’ll review economic conditions, Ecuador real estate, my entire portfolio and investing and business ideas for the months ahead.

Nov 7-9 2008 International Investing and Business Made EZ Ecuador
https://www.garyascott.com/catalog/international-business-made-ez-ecuador

See the wonderful balconies in the Primavera condos at for sale at $46,000 in Cotacachi.

multi-currency-Ecuador-condo-interior

Nov 10-11 Imbabura Real Estate tour
https://www.garyascott.com/catalog/ecuador-real-estat

Then travel to the coast. Enjoy the Vistazul swimming pool on Ecuador’s Pacific.

Picture 9

November 12-15, 2008 Ecuador Coastal Real Estate Tour; Quito Real Estate Tour
https://www.garyascott.com/catalog/ecuador-coastal-real-estate-tour

See discounts for two or more of these courses and tours

Economic Labyrinth


Follow the money three words that form an economic labyrinth and have the potential to destroy the world.

Actually those words create an economic maze not a labyrinth.

Labyrinths are often confused with mazes, but a maze is a  puzzle that confuses the path and direction; Labyrinths have only a single path to the center that are unambiguous ways to the center and back. Labyrinths are not designed to be difficult to navigate.

The Western economic model of working mainly for money to have lots of things and to eventually retire is flawed.

So too is the social concept that having more is better.

The combination of these flaws have hurt the environment…perhaps badly…not to mention our social order.

Now the entire concept is falling apart because bigger is not better.

Correcting this will create some fortunes for those who see ahead.

Environmental investing is one area that is and will continue to prosper.

Shifting China and the US to European/Japanese conceptual models of “smaller is better” will help as well.

A July 7, 2008 USA Today article entitled “New cars will skimp on fuel but not on amenities” by Sharon Silke Carty gives an example when it says: “Automakers are working as fast as they can to meet a new consumer landscape: Buyers want not just fuel-efficient cars but also the same amenities they had in their hulking SUVs.

“It’s a change from how most cars have been set up in the USA.

“If gas prices stay high and demand remains strong for smaller engines, auto executives say the U.S. market will start looking more like Europe’s, where what is considered a small car here is seen as a family sedan.

“People are starting to look at their four-cylinder cars like they did their luxury cars, with leather seats and creature comforts,” says Mike DiGiovanni, General Motors’ executive director of global market analysis. ‘Think about this: The price of fuel in Europe is $7 a gallon, and the industry has survived nicely with smaller vehicles that are loaded up.'”

Automakers that shift fastest to this euro model will clean up.

One way to prosper is to look at how crowded Europe and even more crowded Japan deal with the different supply and demand. The US, Canada, Australia and China all have learned to squander having huge natural resources and space.

No more.

However there is another flaw in the relation to work, fulfillment and living. The idea of having the biggest house on the bloc and “he who has the most toys wins” isn’t working so well anymore.

Bonsai is an example, a Chinese invention that became big in Japan…perfect for limited resources and space.

The Japanese rock or Zen garden, often small, containing sand, gravel, rocks, and occasionally grass and/or other natural elements, with the sea symbolized not by water but by sand raked in patterns that suggest rippling water. Compare this with the large water consuming grass lawn requiring plenty of gasoline to mow.

The Japanese tea ceremony is another…lots of pleasure from limited resource expenditure.

Global shifts in resource supply and demand are creating new lifestyles via economic crisis that will bring a post consumer society.

This shift will be easier than most realize because it is human nature to feel best when working with a sense of purpose. Current shifts are so profound that societies will have to live more purposeful lives.

We try to watch for, adapt to and reflect these shifts in everything we do in our work, play, business and social interactions.

Yet it is not always easy to change after 61 years of doing things one way!

This is why we are busy here at the farm making a number of changes. One was to enhance our labyrinth.

The history of labyrinths dates back into the mists of time, but their religious and spiritual aspects became most noted during the twelfth and thirteenth centuries when many Christian gothic cathedrals installed them in England, Italy and France.

Labyrinths help connect the spiritual side of consciousness in a physical way.

Walking or tracing a labyrinth unites the physical with the spiritual. It brings the inner spiritual life into the outer physical world. We operate in a more holistic way when these inner and outer worlds are united.

Labyrinths represent an easy to follow series of twists and turns from the outer to the inner and back..200% of life, in spirit and material wealth.

Environmentally speaking, labyrinths are great places for exercise as well. They provide the longest amount of walking in the smallest possible space.

We have had a seven circuit classic labyrinth carved in one of our upper, hidden meadows for a numbers of years, but it had grown a bit worn and the meadow overgrown

So Richard and I jumped in my 22 year old Suzuki Samari and headed to the meadow.

samari

We cleaned up.

old labyrinth

Then we called our friend of decades, Chuck Hunner, a master labyrinth builder who had laid out this labyrinth in the first place.

Chuck drove up from his home in Asheville and the three of us enhanced this labyrinth…a lot…including with another good and essential friend John (Deere) putting a heavy stelae in the center.

stellae

The labyrinth is beginning to look better!

labyrinth-taking-shape

You can see the entire process and many pictures of our Merrily Farms Labyrinth being created in Chuck’s Labyrinth Journal.

Chuck is a craftsman with 38 years of experience making art with his hands. For the last 10 years he’s made labyrinths.

His ‘career’ in labyrinth making started when Richard Anderson taught him to
scratch the labyrinth pattern on the beach. The first time Chuck walked into
the pattern he immediately felt the same effect that 15 minutes of deep
meditation gave him.

He makes labyrinths because he knows that they can influence the way people think and feel…this has been for hundreds of years. Walking a labyrinth automatically balances and enhances the way we think. Labyrinth walkers report feeling calm, clear headed and focused. Some experience a catharsis moving old emotions out so that they can see new solutions to the confines of their past. Breakthroughs are almost automatic.

Chuck says he loves labyrinths because they free up his own creative process. A long walk in this small space gets the creative juices flowing and allows new ideas to bubble up into awareness. Ideas come and make life better.

Man working with the environment. Logic uniting with intuition. Work becoming part of play.

There is huge change coming. The change is good. Understanding and adapting to it can help bring profits and help make life better as well.

Gary

Join us and stay at our farm. Enjoy the mountain cool and summer views as you learn.

Or sit at our waterfall.

waterfall

Walk the labyrinth with us during Susan Rotman’s business intuition course.

Or walk the Labyrinth during the splendor of the Blue Ridge leaf change as you learn at our October 3-5, International Business and Investing Made EZ North Carlolina Course.
Labyrinths…lots of walk…little space…uniting the mind, body and emotion. They are springing up all over the US …another sign of how the Western world is changing.

You can see many permanent labyrinths in hospitals, churches and schools near you. Chuck Hunner has helped create many. Try a long walk in a small space.

Labyrinths are another sign of how Western concepts are changing.

Here is a list of Labyrinths that Chuck as worked on in the past few years.

Yanney Park, Kearney, Nebraska
Memphis, Tennessee Cancer Survivors’ Park
Intermountain Medical Center, Murray, Utah.
Lafayette Orinda Presbyterian Church, Lafayette, California.
Trinity United Methodist Church, Ruston, Louisiana.
Labyrinth at Bright School, Chattanooga, Tennessee
Marianjoy Rehabilitation Hospital in Wheaton, Illinois
First United Methodist Church of Ventura, California
First Presbyterian Church, Livermore, California
Central Park Labyrinth, Burlington, Ontario,Canada.
University of Redlands, Redlands, California.
All Saints Cemetery, Salina, Kansas.
Boone Medical Center, Columbia, Missouri..
Church of the Good Shepard, Augusta, Georgia.
Maxey-Gregg Cancer Survivor Park, Columbia, South Carolina.
Trinity Episcopal Church, Santa Barbara, California.
St. Dominics, Houston, Texas.
Danville Labyrinth Project, Danville, Kentucky.
Kanuga Conference Center near Hendersonville, North Carolina.
Dolores, Colorado – Sophia Retreat Center

See pictures of these labyrinths