Tag Archive | "founder"

International Investing Light


There may be international investing light at the end of the tunnel… soon… but we must take care for now.

See below how this can create income in Ecuador.  Hand dyed, all natural yarn ready for beautiful sweaters.

Ecuador-tours

We must take care because before we really see the international economic light, I expect one more downturn this autumn… one that will break the economic backs of many who have been just barely hanging on.

Markets and economies rise and fall in spurts and provide large influxes of  profit that create really bad fiscal and lifestyle habits that are destructive when dangerous economic ex-spurts (recessions) come long. See more about this here

The first dangerous time is when markets rise so much for so long that the general population becomes convinced that “the good life’ will last forever.   Then the second dangerous times comes in the form of a market crash.

The crash destroys many lives and finances.  Then after a year or so the markets rally on news of an economic recovery.  There is a fairly decent broad pickup, led by the consumers, government stimulation,  tax cuts and low interest-rates.   This is a knee-jerk stock market reaction, at the first sign of a healthy economy.  The stock market kicks up 10% at minimum, 30% at best. These rallies are not based on reality though. They are usually short lived.

This short term bear rally spurt is followed by another severe ex-spurt (bear market) which we should expect now.

Here are some tips to help survive such dangerous times:

First recognize that tight economies are best for making money. For example Marc Andreessen co founder of Netscape started Loudcloud, an Internet infrastructure company in a terrible recession  because there was less competition, easier access to good labor. Both businesses and employees are more realistic in tough times.

Tough times can be good because they force us to do what we should already have been doing. Human nature being what it is, we get fat when the times turn easy and seem good. Here are a few tips we should always heed, but sometimes can survive ignoring when economies boom. If we ignore them now, it is at our peril.

#1: Look for every way you can to trim expenses.

#2: Do not be inflexible or proud. Not long ago a seminar delegate told me about a friend who had risen from a zero net worth to having an Internet portfolio worth $300 million. “Then,” the delegate said, “he lost it all when the bubble burst. He went right back to where he started.” That was not quite right. That investor did not go back to where he started. He most likely acquired bad habits when he thought he was worth $300 million! Unless he shed these habits when he went broke they will make it harder for him to succeed again! In good times, we may think we deserve a certain way of life or that some things are inalienable rights. Really our only economic right it to spend a little less (maybe 90%) than we earn.

#3: Always save. No matter how tough the times, always try to save at least 10% of your income. Those who do this almost never run into economic trouble.

#4: Look harder for the silver lining. There are more in bad times than good. An old British saying is “where there is muck there is brass.”  Business is solving problems and difficult times create problems. Look for ways that you (or your investments) can help others squeeze through tight times.

#5: Be positive. One of the greatest risks in recession is a can’t win attitude. If the economy falls drastically (say 30%), you still only have to be in the top 70% to get by. The entire history of modern humanity has been one of long term growth chopped by short term recessions. Current conditions are nothing new.

#6: Remain true to your economic plan. Use three phase investing as described many times in our messages. Do not panic and stick by your investments (assuming they were made intelligently to begin). This will increase your odds of success and help you with step seven.

#7: Maintain perspective.  A USA Today article “American Workers Rethink Priorities” pointed out that many workers are taking time to rethink their grueling schedules or about pursuing work that might pay less but is more meaningful. We live in the richest, most incredible era that mankind has ever known. Our poorest have more than the richest of just centuries ago. Yet this can be hard to remember when caught in the day-to-day rush of the material rat race. Inspired investing is doing what we love and figuring out how to make money from it. We increase our odds of success and enjoy what we are doing more. When times are tough and the economy slows, this perspective can give us time to sit back for at least a few moments and ask, “What do I really want to do with the rest of my life?”

The answer is the most important asset you will ever receive.

Until next message, good global business and investing!

Gary

The greatest asset of all is the ability to earn wherever you live, which brings everlasting wealth.

This is why we offer our course Tangled Web… How to Have an Internet Business.

This is why I am giving everyone who enrolls in our North Carolina or November Ecuador International Business & Investing seminar our “Tangled Web… How to Have an Internet Business Course” (offered at $299) free.

Here are comments from a reader about the way we help:  Thank you for your inspiration and information outlining foreign banking and retirement.  Your comments and suggestions are welcome for planning the steps to evaluate the early stages of living abroad.

Join us with Jyske. Learn more about global investing, how to have an international business and diversification in Ecuador at the seminar.

Oct. 9-11 IBEZ North Carolina with our webmaster  David Cross & Thomas Fischer of JGAM

October 16-18 Ecuador Southern coastal tour Only One Place Left

Oct. 21-24 Ecuador Import Export Tour

Oct. 25-26 Imbabura Real Estate Tour

On the Ecuador Import Export Tour we visit Winter House, a boutique wool factory.

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They make wonderful organic cotton and wool prodcuts with all natural dyes.

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Their sweaters are very colorful and they’ll sell just one  but also ship entire loads to retialers in the US and Canada.  You can create basics or have them put together your own design.

Nov. 6-8 IBEZ Ecuador Seminar

Nov. 9-10 Imbabura Real Estate Tour

Nov. 11-14 Ecuador Coastal Real Estate Tour

Attend any two Ecuador seminar or tours in a calendar month…$949 for one.  $1,349 for two.

Attend any three Ecuador courses or tours in a calendar month…$1,199 for one.  $1,799

Retire in Ecuador & Live Longer


Retire in Ecuador, work and live longer!

Many who planned to retire… cannot…  because of the global economic crash.   They have to work.  So why not work instead of retire in Ecuador?

It may be hard to get a job… a good one especially… in Ecuador or anywhere right now.  We can take advantage of this fact and work at something we love by working with our own business.

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Ecuador is a safe, low stress place. These children work in Otavalo and ride on their own, on tour buses selling scarves, dolls and rugs.  The oldest (on the right) is 15.

There are several reasons why it’s good not to retire in Ecuador… but to work instead.

First retirement, in Ecuador or anywhere, kills! An important part of longevity, for those who retire or not, for those who work in Ecuador or not,  is to remain independent, challenged, active and needed.

One of the most important features that was found in the valleys of Ecuador where people rarely retire but live long lives, is that old age was revered.  In Ecuador old age its not viewed as bad…  Maturity is highly respected.  People at the age of 100, even 110 are known to still be active and working!  There is not the same old age glass ceiling as in the West.

If you plan to work beyond retirement age, why not provide your services in a place where you efforts are more appreciated?

One does not have to move to Ecuador to work.  There are innumerable stories worldwide of how staying at work extends life.

One non retirement story that motivated me is of Max Zimmer of Los Angeles.  Max came to the US from Austria in 1911 with only a two dollar bill. At age 103 he still had the same two-dollar bill and had built and still ran a multimillion-dollar business.

One MD who specializes in anti aging points out that most centenarians seldom spend much time with doctors. When they finally get sick, they die quickly and with little expense. They depend on themselves to remain healthy not others.

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Ecuador is becoming an increasingly international place, offering more opportunity for business work and retirement. Here are the flags of our visitors at our inn, Meson de las Flores.

A second extra income from Ecuador retirement work, is that your efforts can be more effective and enjoyable because the cost of living is low. When it is easy to live within your means… huge stress is removed… and make no mistake… stress kills.

Third, living in a country, like Ecuador, where slow and steady, is a lifestyle foundation, enhances longevity and makes life more enjoyable as well.

Having a good savings and investment plan for old age is an important factor to remaining independent.  But the recent economic downturn has destroyed this for many, so why not at least be able to take it easy a bit as you work. Enjoy a more laid back lifestyle.

The world has put itself in an economic mess.  We do not have to participate if we steadily do something we love in a balanced way.

Live where you can afford. Enjoy serving someone every day  and spend less than you earn in healthy surroundings where society appreciates your efforts.

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Ecuador has a great supply of fresh, low cost food.

Excerpts from a recent USA Today article by Noah Berger entitled “Kazuo Inamori, founder of Kyocera, says today’s problems are caused by capitalism’s excesses”  fine tunes this point when it says:

INAMORI’S TIPS

Capitalism brought prosperity to mankind. Today’s problems are due to capitalism’s excesses.

Seek profits for the good of society and long-term sustainability of companies.
Lead with altruism and modesty, seeking reasonable profit over the long term.

Q: The 20th century ended with the greatest prosperity in human history. Doesn’t capitalism deserve the credit?

A: Capitalism was able to bring previously unknown levels of prosperity to humankind. We have now fallen into an unprecedented recession brought about by capitalism. With humankind’s unlimited desire to earn more profits and live more affluent lifestyles, financial institutions launched new instruments, such as derivatives, using advanced mathematics and statistics. They created enormous profits by leveraging funds that were 10 times larger than their assets. This human desire caused the economic collapse. While the past prosperity resulted directly from the achievements of capitalism, the present difficulties have resulted from capitalism’s excesses.

Q: Leverage has not always been bad. Won’t there be times when Kyocera competitors will do far better because they are willing to take a risk with leverage?

A: You are right. It’s easy to outperform companies like Kyocera. Companies make huge profits by leveraging their capital. However, if society and employees need a company, then it has to be maintained so it can grow for a long time. This is a company’s mission, to maintain and expand for the long haul. The correct way to manage a company is to have a firm financial foundation that is capable of overcoming economic downturns rather than making a significant profit in the short term. I will continue to aim for stable management even though we are facing harsh economic challenges.

Inamori is now 77-years old and is showing no signs of slowing down! I chose to quote him because he is a great example of steady success and shows how continuing to work rather than retire enhances longevity.

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Inamori was born in  Japan and at age 27, he started Kyocera. His company is now a high-tech multinational maker of cellphones, office document equipment, solar power products and ceramic components that employs 66,000.  He founded KDDI in 1984, which is now Japan’s second-largest telecom network.

Yet he has not just followed the money.  He is an ordained Zen Buddhist monk. His priest name Dai-wa, means “great harmony.” 

Our lives do not have to be dictated by the errors of others.  No matter how insane a society becomes, we as individuals can remain steady, balanced and happy by serving others while living within our means.

Retirement in Ecuador makes good living less expensive.  Yet we can adhere to these principles anywhere to live longer and happier… not tired or retired no matter how old we are.

See more on Ecuador retirement at Why Ecuador Retirement and  Retire in Ecuador Idea.

Gary

Join us at our North Carolina farm this July or October for our International business & investing seminars below.

July 24-26 IBEZ North Carolina

Oct. 9-11 IBEZ North Carolina

Or join us and learn more about living and retiring in Ecuador.

July 24-26 IBEZ North Carolina

Oct. 9-11 IBEZ North Carolina

Or join us in Ecuador and learn more about living and retiring in Ecuador.

Sept. 17-21 Ecuador Spanish Course
Sept. 23-24 Imbabura Real Estate Tour
Sept. 25-28 Ecuador Coastal Real Estate Tour

Oct. 21-24 Ecuador Import Export Tour

Nov. 6-8 IBEZ Ecuador
Nov. 9-10 Imbabura Real Estate Tour
Nov. 11-14 Ecuador Coastal Real Estate Tour

Read “Kazuo Inamori, founder of Kyocera, says today’s problems are caused by capitalism’s excesses” at  http://www.usatoday.com/money/companies/management/advice/2009-04-19-advice-inamori_N.htm

Ecuador & Longevity


Ecuador is known for the longevity of many of its residents.

National Geographic published a great article, “Every Day Over 100 is a Gift” that outlined how and why residents in some Ecuador valleys like Vilcabamba live much longer (up to 130 years) than in the West.

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View of Vilcabamba from Club Hacienda el Atillo , Resort and Spa.

Yesterday’s message Ecuador and global investing pointed out that May 2, 2009 was the 41st anniversary of my investing and working globally.  That message ended with my plans for sharing the next 41 years with you.

Don’t Believe it?

62? Plus 41?  103? Could this be true?  I have a great grandparent (from Wales) who lived to 106, so why not?

Expecting to live long (I mean really expecting) makes it is more likely that you will. One of the greatest health risks we have is buying into the social myth that we should retire at age 65.

Every ancient text of wisdom suggests that 50 years of age is the midpoint… the time when life becomes more spiritual, wiser and that we have 50 or  more years to go.  If you are Biblical try rereading the book of Leviticus.

I believe this.  Below you’ll see  someone who agrees!

How will you look when you are 97?

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This is a photo of Shigeaki Hinohara this year at age 97.  The photo was taken from an article at japantimes.co.jp entitled WORDS TO LIVE BY Author/physician Shigeaki Hinohara by Judit Kawaguchi.

Here is an excerpt from that article (the address for the entire article is at the end of this message).

At the age of 97 years and 4 months, Shigeaki Hinohara is one of the world’s longest-serving physicians and educators. Hinohara’s magic touch is legendary: Since 1941 he has been healing patients at St. Luke’s International Hospital in Tokyo and teaching at St. Luke’s College of Nursing.

Always willing to try new things, he has published around 150 books since his 75th birthday, including one “Living Long, Living Good” that has sold more than 1.2 million copies. As the founder of the New Elderly Movement, Hinohara encourages others to live a long and happy life, a quest in which no role model is better than the doctor himself.

Energy comes from feeling good, not from eating well or sleeping a lot. We all remember how as children, when we were having fun, we often forgot to eat or sleep. I believe that we can keep that attitude as adults, too. It’s best not to tire the body with too many rules such as lunchtime and bedtime.

All people who live long — regardless of nationality, race or gender — share one thing in common: None are overweight. For breakfast I drink coffee, a glass of milk and some orange juice with a tablespoon of olive oil in it. Olive oil is great for the arteries and keeps my skin healthy. Lunch is milk and a few cookies, or nothing when I am too busy to eat. I never get hungry because I focus on my work. Dinner is veggies, a bit of fish and rice, and, twice a week, 100 grams of lean meat.

Always plan ahead. My schedule book is already full until 2014, with lectures and my usual hospital work. In 2016 I’ll have some fun, though: I plan to attend the Tokyo Olympics!

There is no need to ever retire, but if one must, it should be a lot later than 65.

Share what you know.

When a doctor recommends you take a test or have some surgery, ask whether the doctor would suggest that his or her spouse or children go through such a procedure.

To stay healthy, always take the stairs and carry your own stuff.

My inspiration is Robert Browning’s poem “Abt Vogler.” My father used to read it to me. It encourages us to make big art, not small scribbles. It says to try to draw a circle so huge that there is no way we can finish it while we are alive. All we see is an arch; the rest is beyond our vision but it is there in the distance.

Pain is mysterious, and having fun is the best way to forget it.

Don’t be crazy about amassing material things. Remember: You don’t know when your number is up, and you can’t take it with you to the next place.

Science alone can’t cure or help people.

Life is filled with incidents. On March 31, 1970, when I was 59 years old, I boarded the Yodogo, a flight from Tokyo to Fukuoka. It was a beautiful sunny morning, and as Mount Fuji came into sight, the plane was hijacked by the Japanese Communist League-Red Army Faction. I spent the next four days handcuffed to my seat in 40-degree heat. As a doctor, I looked at it all as an experiment and was amazed at how the body slowed down in a crisis.

Find a role model and aim to achieve even more than they could ever do.

It’s wonderful to live long. Until one is 60 years old, it is easy to work for one’s family and to achieve one’s goals. But in our later years, we should strive to contribute to society. Since the age of 65, I have worked as a volunteer. I still put in 18 hours seven days a week and love every minute of it.

These are some great tips and Hinohara is proof of the pudding that we can improve our chances of longevity anywhere!

Gary

ecuador-longevity

Shamanic Mingo at Inkapirka.

Learn secrets of longevity on our Ecuador Shamanic Mingo Tour.

June 12-14 Shamanic Mingo Tour

June 16-17 Imbabura Real Estate Tour

June 18-21 Ecuador Coastal Real Estate Tour

Attend any two Ecuador courses or tours in a calendar month…$949 for one.  $1,349 for two.

Attend any three Ecuador courses or tours in a calendar month…$1,199 for one.  $1,799 for two.

There is such an important connection between good health, longevity and wealth that Merri and I incorporate longevity sessions into our courses, especially your shamanic mingo tour.

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Good food, like this fruit at the Cotacachi Ecuador farmers market is important to longevity.

Here is what some previous delegates have said about our tours.   These tours  change lives in more than just monetary ways as some of the delegates who have attended previous courses have written.

“For years and years I have searched for truly like- minded people to play with and work with… people who are deeply and honestly SPIRITUAL.”  J.M. Texas

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Longevity comes in safe places were even small children like this Andean girl are allowed freedom from crime day and night.

Here is another rave from a delegate:

“People who, among other things, are active and productive and creative and resourceful, whose word can be counted upon; People who realize that spirituality DOES NOT mean sitting in a cave contemplating your navel and weaving baskets, nor does it equate in the Western culture with living in abject poverty. People who realize that abundance is not a dirty word. People who understand that we are here to ENGAGE life, not to submit to circumstances out of fear and ignorance and apathy; People who don’t just use the most current “buzz words” so they can feel like they are part of the group, but who actually DO something… Builders. Thank you for showing up in my life.” E.W. Nevada

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Here is a sacred valley we will visit on our Ecuador shamanic tour and another rave”

“The life path altering effects from the weekend with you and Merri continue. Thank you again. I have begun to change my diet. Bless you! “ D.B. Connecticut

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Knowing who supplies your food is important to longevity… as are places of person to person commerce, like these markets we visit on our Ecuador Shaman tour.

Here is what another delegate said.

“You are indeed a spiritual pioneer, blending disciplines to create tools and resources for success in this new land of opportunity. Anyone who thinks this is just all about money is missing the real message: This is about life in its most profound implications.” W.P. Australia

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Having sources of fresh food, like this Cotacachi Ecuador corn field, nearby is good for longevity.

Here is another endorsement:

I want to thank you for the wonderful time. I traveled from California to hear you convey your knowledge in the way you do so well, and I wasn’t disappointed. The amount of information in the sessions was almost overwhelming, but it’s exactly what I went to hear. When I try to engage intelligent, educated people on these subjects here at home, I usually get a blank look or “That’s interesting, but why are you thinking about that? “The setting at the farm felt like we were all sitting in the den after dinner discussing things among friends. The relaxed atmosphere seemed to encourage people to participate, asking pointed questions and relating personal experiences. The international flavor and attitude of the group was very stimulating, particularly when we split up into discussion groups. Those groups, taking walks together, allowed us to get to know each other on a personal level. Anyway, what I’m trying to say is, that’s the most fun I’ve had for four days straight in along time! Thanks again.” B.R. California

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Longevity and living in harmony with nature go hand in hand.  Here is a humming bird in Cotacachi. Ecuador has one of the largest bird diversities in the world.

One more comment from a delegate:

“A special warm ‘thank you’ to Merri for the wonderful cooking and the ‘feel at home atmosphere!’ I like to give a few comments about the past weekend.. It was relaxing, inspiring, informative and a spiritually balanced atmosphere with all these different, same thinking, like people. The technical information I gathered was most not new to me, but I like to compliment you for putting it all in the right perspective and to make it very understandable to all. What was a tour opinion one of the most important gaining of these 3 days is the opening of the new world, this new circle of what you call “normal” people! (I call us ‘not normal’ as a matter of respect to the majority. ) But as we know, all is relative and depends at the point of view of each, His spiritual mind and his opinion about the senses of our being.”

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Having special places to go and relax… like La Mirage Spa in Cotacachi shown here… help longevity too.

Learn secrets of longevity on our Ecuador Shamanic Mingo Tour.

June 12-14 Shamanic Mingo Tour

June 16-17 Imbabura Real Estate Tour

June 18-21 Ecuador Coastal Real Estate Tour

Attend any two Ecuador courses or tours in a calendar month…$949 for one.  $1,349 for two.

Attend any three Ecuador courses or tours in a calendar month…$1,199 for one.  $1,799 for two.

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Merri and me with friends and Taita Yatchak in Sacred LLanganatis longevity valley.

You can read the entire longevity article, WORDS TO LIVE BY Author/physician Shigeaki Hinohara by Judit Kawaguchi at

http://search.japantimes.co.jp/cgi-bin/fl20090129jk.html