Fear This


What would you do if the Dow dropped 5,000 points tomorrow?

Really?  Be honest with yourself.

I know how I would react because I remember a phone call.

My mother-in-law.

The least investment oriented person in the world but… even she was in a panic.

That call was Oct. 19, 1987.

The Dow Jones Industrial Index had crashed more than 20% in one day.

She wanted to know, “will this crash get worse?”

The truth?

I did not know.

When it comes to investing…  there is always some risk.

geese

Investments are like a flock of geese.

We know they go north in spring.

But exactly when they fly is a mystery.

We know they go south in the fall.

Yet not the exact day.

Nor can we say precisely which goose will lead… for how long…  at what time.

The movement of geese and the price movements of equities are both ruled by laws of nature that we can never totally know.

The chances of seeing a gaggle of geese migrating south in October is more likely, but ask any hunter, photographer or bird watcher sitings are hardly assured… especially at any specific time.

When it comes to investing…  there is always something we do not know.

There are, however, three things we do know about the stock market.

#1: Periods of high performance are followed by periods of low performance (and vice versa).

#2: Periods of low performance move more quickly that periods of high performance and usually start with a sudden drop.

#3: We are more likely to see a period of low performance begin in September or October.

We dodged a September bullet this year and saw the DJI reach an all time high over 22,400.

Now we face October.

Will the stock market be good or bad?

We do not know, but we do know that another law of nature, one that prepares us as humans to survive, makes most of us ill prepared emotionally to trade in shares.

The Wall Street Journal article “Will You Be Ready When the Stock Market Crashes Again?” (1) dramatizes our human frailties when it tells this true story.

With U.S. stocks hitting all-time highs this past week and the calendar just about to flip to October, think 30 years back with me to Friday, Oct. 16, 1987.

The stock market is up more than 30% for the year so far. But traders are jittery: Interest rates are rising, tax rates are in flux and the U.S. is bickering with international trade partners and skirmishing with Iran.

James O’Shaughnessy, a young investor in St. Paul, Minn., has made a “five-figure” bet on stock-index put options, a way of profiting from a sharp fall in price on a basket of big U.S. stocks. Plugging his phone into a modem that dials up a stock-quotation service, he grows more and more nervous as the day goes on and the Dow Jones Industrial Average falls a record 108.35 points on unprecedented volume of nearly 339 million shares.

The selling is “completely overdone,” he thinks: Stocks are bound to bounce back big on Monday “and then I’ll get killed” for hanging on to the bearish bet. “A feeling of panic washed over my entire body,” Mr. O’Shaughnessy says. “I’ve just got to get out.” He calls his broker a half-hour before the market closes and sells it all.

Humans have a bias against risk.

Feelings that we’ll “get killed” for holding our bets are natural.

Panic that washes over our entire bodies. This emotion creates a performance gap.  Investors overall earn less than the sector they invest in.

This performance gap is very real.  We should face this fact and prepare for it.

The WSJ article tells how O’Shaughnessy missed a huge opportunity.  On October 17, 1987 he sold his his puts, to avert a huge loss.  The next day the Dow drops 208 points in the first 90 minutes, of trading.

A wave of global selling caused the Dow to fallen 22.6%, “the worst day in Wall Street history,”.   That’s the equivalent of a 5,000 point drop today.  He lost a 1,000% one day profit!

You can’t survive a market crash if you think it can’t happen. And something like Oct. 19, 1987, will happen again. In fact, it already has: On May 6, 2010, many stocks dropped 60% or more in a flash, although they bounced right back. On Aug. 24, 2015, the Dow fell more than 1,000 points, or 7%, in six minutes, before closing down nearly 4% for the day. Between the market’s peak in October 2007 and its bottom on March 9, 2009, the S&P 500 fell 55.2%, even after counting reinvested dividends.

Take it from Mr. O’Shaughnessy, who today manages nearly $6 billion at O’Shaughnessy Asset Management in Stamford, Conn. Even though he based it on factors he no longer believes in, his original analysis was absolutely right: The stock market was overvalued. Between September 1986 and the end of August 1987, stocks had gone from trading at 16 times earnings to a price/earnings ratio of 21.4, a 33% rise that put the market’s P/E at its highest level since the end of 1961.

His emotional reaction, however, was dead wrong. Had Mr. O’Shaughnessy held his ground for one more day, he would have made roughly 10 times his money, he recalls.

No one knows when the super heated US stock market will begin its next bear trend.

What we do know is the value of the US market compared to its history and to other stock markets around the world.

The numbers below from Keppler Asset Management, another source of data we follow at Pi,  shows that the price-to-book of the MSCI US Share Index at 3.13 price-to-book is still well below the super inflated price to book of 4.23 in December 1999.

keppler

A bear will again descend on Wall Street.

The autumn and winter months ahead are a likely time.

Yet we cannot be sure.

We can still see profits and growth in US shares and we will… until we won’t.

All stock markets have risk and volatility, but that if you invest in the top ten good value markets, that have a price-to-book of just 1.43,  this is a much better deal than paying 3.13 price to book  for US shares that are their record high.

Take extra caution in your equity investments now.  The volatility quotient of the DJI is about 10%.

The trend is bullish so the trend won’t break until the DJI drops below 20,000.

That could happen in minutes tomorrow… or any day.

Remain alert.  Short-term trading algorithms can cause market trends to shift at astounding speed.

Prepare now what you will do if the markets panic.

Create a plan based on math based good value economic data.

Include watching the price of gold.

When the crash comes, stick to you plan.

Do not panic.

Turn on the auto pilot and normally add to your position.

Do not let feelings influence you too much.  Use logic.

Gary

Increase Safety – Earn More

garyheadshot

The Purposeful investing Course (Pi) is NOT about fast moving, speculative stock and currency trading.  Pi is about slow, worry free, good value investing from finding good value. 

There are only three reasons why we should invest.  We invest for income.  We invest to resell our investments for more than we had invested.  We should invest to make the world a better place.

We should not invest for fun, excitement or to get rich quick.  Let’s put our time to better use.

This is why the core Pi model portfolio (that forms the bulk of my own equity portfolio) consists of 19 shares and this position has not changed in over two years.  During these two years we have been steadily accumulating the same 19 shares and have not traded once.

This good value portfolio is based entirely on good value financial information and math.

The Pifolio is a theoretical portfolio of MSCI Country Benchmark Index ETFs that cover all the good value markets developed using my 50 years of investing experience and study of the mathematical market analysis of Michael Keppler and his company, Asset Management.

In my opinion, Keppler is one of the best market statisticians in the world.  Numerous very large fund managers, such as State Street Global Advisers, use his analysis to manage over $2.5 billion of funds.

The Pifolio analysis begins with Keppler who continually researches international major stock markets and compares their value based on current book to price, cash flow to price, earnings to price, average dividend yield, return on equity and cash flow return.  He compares each major stock market’s history.

Fwd: keppler

Michael Kepler CEO Keppler Asset Management.

Michael is a brilliant mathematician.  We have tracked his analysis for over 20 years.   He continually researches international major stock markets and compares their value based on current book to price, cash flow to price, earnings to price, average dividend yield, return on equity and cash flow return.  He compares each stock market’s history.  From this, he develops his Good Value Stock Market Strategy and rates each market as a Buy, Neutral or Sell market.  His analysis is rational, mathematical and does not cause worry about short term ups and downs.  Keppler’s strategy is to diversify into an equally weighted portfolio of the MSCI Indices of each BUY market.

This is an easy, simple and effective approach to zeroing in on value because little time, management and guesswork is required.  You are investing in a diversified portfolio of good value indices.

A BUY rating for an index does NOT imply that any stock in that country is an attractive investment, so you do not have to spend hours of research aimed at picking specific shares.  It is not appropriate or enough to instruct a stockbroker to simply select stocks in the BUY rated countries.  Investing in the index is like investing in all the shares in the index.  You save time because all you have to do is invest in the ETF to gain the profit potential of the entire market.

To achieve this goal of diversification the Pifolio consists of Country Index ETFs.

Country Index ETFs are similar to an index mutual fund but are shares normally traded on a major stock exchange that tracks an index of shares in a specific country.  ETFs do not try to beat the index they represent.  The management is passive and tries to emulate the performance of the index.

A country ETF provides diversification into a basket of equities in the country covered.  The expense ratios for most ETFs are lower than those of the average mutual fund as well so such ETFs provide diversification and cost efficiency.

Here is the Pifolio.

70% is diversified into Keppler’s good value (BUY rated) developed markets: Australia, Austria, France, Germany, Hong Kong, Italy, Japan, Norway, Singapore and the United Kingdom.

30% of the Pifolio is invested in Keppler’s good value (BUY rated) emerging markets: Brazil, Chile, China, Colombia, the Czech Republic, South Korea, Malaysia and Taiwan.

The Pifolio consists of iShares ETFs that invested in each of the MSCI indicies of these BUY markets.

For example, the iShares MSCI Australia (symbol EWA) is a Country Index ETF that tracks the investment results the Morgan Stanley Capital Index MSCI Australia Index which is composed mainly of large cap and small cap stocks traded primarily on the Australian Stock Exchange mainly of companies in consumer staples, financials and materials. This ETF is non-diversified outside of Australia.

iShares is owned by Black Rock, Inc. the world’s largest asset manager with over $4 trillion in assets under management.

The Pifolio is the main portfolio we study in our Purposeful investing Course.  Then we add spice with leveraged speculations that offer additional profit potential often using leverage.

My fifty years of global investing experience helps take advantage of numerous long term cycles that are part of the universal math that affects all investments.

For example in the 1980s, a remarkable set of two economic circumstances helped anyone who spotted them become remarkably rich.  Some of my readers made enough to retire.  Others picked up 50% currency gains.  Then the cycle ended.  Warren Buffett explained the importance of this ending in a 1999 Fortune magazine interview.  He said:  Let me summarize what I’ve been saying about the stock market: I think it’s very hard to come up with a persuasive case that equities will over the next 17 years perform anything like—anything like—they’ve performed in the past 17!

I did well then, but always thought, “I should have invested more!”  Now those circumstances have come together and I am investing in them again.

The circumstances that created fortunes 30 years ago were an overvalued US market (compared to global markets) and an overvalued US dollar.

The two conditions are in place again!  There are currently the ten good value non US developed markets and none good value emerging markets mentioned above.

Pi shows how to easily create a diversified, worry free portfolio that includes each or all of these countries with Country Index ETFs.

The current strength of the US dollar is a second remarkable similarity to 30 years ago.  Three decades past, in 1985 the dollar rose along with Wall Street.  Profits came quickly over three years.  Then in 1988 the dollar dropped like a stone, by 51%  in just two years.  A repeat of this pattern is growing and could create up to 50% extra profit if we start using strong dollars to accumulate good value stock market ETFs in other currencies.

Guarantee

Enroll in Pi.   I guarantee you’ll learn ideas about investing that are unique and can reduce stress as they help you enhance your profits through slow, worry free purposeful investing.  If you are not totally happy, simply let me know anytime within 60 days.

#2:  I guarantee to cancel your subscription and refund your subscription fee in full, no questions asked.

  Subscribe to the Pi for $197.

Gary

(1)  wsj.com: Will you be ready when the stock market crashes-again


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