Between the Lines-Health Care Muddle


Read between the lines.  Excerpts from a recent Wall Street Journal article show why health care reform is such a mess beyond politics.

The article said: The best laid plans of politicians often go awry, and then there’s Philadelphia’s soda tax.  A new Tax Foundation report finds that the 1.5-cent-an-ounce levy that took effect in January is hurting low-income workers and producing less revenue than promised, but at least it’s helping beer sales. Allow us to explain.

Between the lines:  Our culture has been indoctrinated to consume too many addictive beverages (soda and beer) that mess up the blood sugar level and that contributes to numerous other health imbalances.  Health insurance for a culture that thrives on illness producing habits will be expensive no matter how the law is set.

The article continues: Mayor James Kenney and the City Council sold the tax as a revenue boon that would finance universal pre-K education.  But the Tax Foundation reports that only 49% of the revenue is going to pre-K in practice in the first five years while the rest is going to fund government worker benefits and other city programs.

Between the lines:  Like so many government promises, this one has not been kept.  Less than half is going where it could really help, to educate children not to drink addictive disease creating beverages.  How can a cynical public be expected  to believe in and support a government that continually and blatantly lies?

These are just a couple of the problems that are not even looked at when it comes to health care reform.

If the following issues were addressed, perhaps some progress could be seen.

#1:  Lifestyle changes for the entire culture.  Better nutrition.  More exercise.  Reduction of stress.

#2: Change of tort law to reduce malpractice costs.

#3: Shift US pharmaceutical costs to match the rest of the world.

Don’t get me wrong.  None of these changes would be simple or easy to implement.  There would still be enormous challenges to overcome.  I will be surprised if any of them are introduced in health care legislation.

Between the lines:  Don’t expect health care reform to provide better health care or lower costs of  health care.

The only solution for each of us is to make our own lifestyle changes so we create our own natural good health and avoid the health care system as much as possible.

One of the largest health care websites, Mercola.com, shows why it is good practice to avoid the health care system.

His site says:  More Than Half of All Medical Procedures Are of No Benefit and Many Actually Cause Harm

Many common medical treatments are not helping patients at all—or are actually harming them. Of the studies that tested an existing standard of care, 40 percent reversed the practice, compared to only 38 percent reaffirming it. The remaining 22 percent was inconclusive.

This means that between 40 and 78 percent of the medical testing, treatments, and procedures you receive are of NO benefit to you—or are actually harmful—as determined by clinical studies.

There are no pharmaceuticals here…

Merri and I have never taken prescription drugs and we do not plan to take any either.  We take as much responsibility for our own health as we can.

We have disciplines for our nutrition, our exercise and our consciousness and believe this effort and expense is more important (and better for us at least) than traditional Western medicine routines.

We eat as much fresh food as we can and strengthen the nutrition with good eating habits (main meal at noon, little in the evening) and fortify this with numerous food supplements,  Omega 3, Trifala, Vitamin D and Ashwaganda at night and Vitality Force at dawn.

See more about Vitality Force below.

Sensible health care reform is not likely to take place in the immediate future.  Fortunately our bodies are adaptable and strong.  When we make better lifestyle decisions and take action, we can leave the muddle and health care quagmire to the politicians.

Gary

 

 


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