Doorways to Better Learning


The more we are, the better.   The better we learn, the more we are.

Quantum science suggests, however, that in reality we already know everything.  This means that learning is not a process of acquiring but is a process of access and transformation.

Our intuition defines a scrap of the infinite.   Our logic converts this piece of reality into something useful in our material world.

This is why the more we know, we know and the more we know how we know… the better.

From getty iamges

For example have you ever walked into the kitchen opened the fridge and then stood there staring… and wondering… “What am I doing here?” (Photo from Getty Images.)

There is good news. The “What am I doing?” refrigerator stare is more likely to be caused by a highly valuable learning mechanism in the brain that helps you retain information.

A Scientific American website article “Why Walking through a Doorway Makes You Forget” by Charles B. Brenner and Jeffrey M. Zacks can help us understand why this art of forgetting current information is a perfectly normal event.

Here is an excerpt (bolds are mine):  Scientists measure the “doorway effect,” and it supports a novel model of human memory

Doorway to Blame for Room Amnesia

You’re sitting at your desk in your office at home. Digging for something under a stack of papers, you find a dirty coffee mug that’s been there so long it’s eligible for carbon dating.  Better wash it. You pick up the mug, walk out the door of your office, and head toward the kitchen.  By the time you get to the kitchen, though, you’ve forgotten why you stood up in the first place, and you wander back to your office, feeling a little confused—until you look down and see the cup.

The common and annoying experience of arriving somewhere only to realize you’ve forgotten what you went there to do.  We all know why such forgetting happens: we didn’t pay enough attention, or too much time passed, or it just wasn’t important enough.  But a “completely different” idea comes from a team of researchers at the University of Notre Dame.  The first part of their paper’s title sums it up:  “Walking through doorways causes forgetting.”

As the title said, walking through doorways caused forgetting: Their responses were both slower and less accurate when they’d walked through a doorway into a new room than when they’d walked the same distance within the same room.

This “doorway effect” appears to be quite general.  It doesn’t seem to matter, for instance, whether the virtual environments are displayed on a 66” flat screen or a 17” CRT.

Is it walking through the doorway that causes the forgetting, or is it that remembering is easier in the room in which you originally took in the information?

Psychologists have known for a while that memory works best when the context during testing matches the context during learning; this is an example of what is called the encoding specificity principle.  But the third experiment of the Notre Dame study shows that it’s not just the mismatching context driving the doorway effect.  In this experiment (run in VR), participants sometimes picked up an object, walked through a door, and then walked through a second door that brought them either to a new room or back to the first room.  If matching the context is what counts, then walking back to the old room should boost recall. It did not.

The doorway effect suggests that there’s more to the remembering than just what you paid attention to, when it happened, and how hard you tried.  Instead, some forms of memory seem to be optimized to keep information ready-to-hand until its shelf life expires, and then purge that information in favor of new stuff.  Radvansky and colleagues call this sort of memory representation an “event model,” and propose that walking through a doorway is a good time to purge your event models because whatever happened in the old room is likely to become less relevant now that you have changed venues.

Other changes may induce a purge as well:  A friend knocks on the door, you finish the task you were working on, or your computer battery runs down and you have to plug in to recharge.

Why would we have a memory system set up to forget things as soon as we finish one thing and move on to another?  Because we can’t keep everything ready-to-hand, and most of the time the system functions beautifully.

We use the importance of context in the super thinking sessions of our courses and seminars.   Plus the super thinking learning system accounts for the fact that you smell, hear and the colors you see all have an impact on how well we learn and recall.

One way we learn better is with music.

Music opens our awareness in different ways depending on the type of music.  I am not sure anyone knows entirely why… but music has been used by cultures almost since time began.   The use of music can run from romantic to a military march to patriotic songs to music that helps us exercise better.

One fact about music that is know is that certain types of music affect humans in the same way regardless of color, race, religion.  Sad music makes all people sad. Happy music makes all people happy!

from wsjatricle

Photo from Wall  Street Journal article entitled “Looking for a perfect tune for your workout?”

Here is an excerpt:  Researchers have identified the optimal tempo for music to improve exercise and shown that music can increase oxygen intake and stamina. WSJ Your Health columnist Sumathi Reddy reports.
Research has found that at the right tempo, music can reduce the sense of exertion as well as boost motivation. Costas Karageorghis, deputy head of research at the School of Sport and Education at London’s Brunel University, says the “sweet spot” for workout music is between 125 and 140 beats per minute when people aren’t trying to time their movements to the music. Previously, experts believed that the faster a person exercises, the faster the music tempo should be.

Other new studies have shown that when athletes synchronize their movements to a musical beat, their bodies can handle more exertion: Treadmill walkers had greater stamina and cyclists required less oxygen uptake. And swimmers who listened to music during races finished faster than others who didn’t.

“Music can alter emotional and physiological arousal much like a pharmacological stimulant or sedative,” says Dr. Karageorghis, who has worked as a consultant psychologist to music and sports-equipment companies and for Olympic athletes. “It has the capacity to stimulate people even before they go into the gym.”

Music can help you work out.  Music can also help you learn and know more.

Power in Baroque Music

To gain from these facts Merri and I listen to 60 beat ten cycle classical music… recommended by Dr.Georgi Lozanov, the great Bulgarian educator.

You could count the number of times we have missed our meditation routine in the last 20 years on one hand.

The frequencies in silence, meditation and music have been proven many times, in many ways to improve health and intelligence.

Here are some ideas and music that could improve health and intelligence.

The system Lozanov utilized three types of music in three phases to enhance absorption, retention and recall.

The first phase uses introductory music, along with deep breathing exercises, for relaxation and to move the mind into an Alpha state. This is where the health benefits seem to begin as well. Blood pressure can drop, heart rate slows and the mind becomes calmed.

Next an active concert is heard. At this stage, the information to be learned is read.

Finally, a passive concert is used as the new information is again reviewed. This baroque music and its beat help put the mind in a state where the information absorbed shifts into long-term memory.

For example here is are some ideas and music that can improve your health and intelligence and how I would research some new idea or study something new.

First, I would meditate (or practice some form of slow yoga or breathing exercise) for 20 minutes, then listen to relaxing Baroque music such as Handel’s Water Music. (Click to listen)

This process tunes our minds into nature’s deeper wisdom, tunes us into the wisdom of silence where the noise of our logic is not heard. This creates what seems to be extraordinary intelligence but is really just taking us to the deeper levels of wisdom we all (as creations of nature) possess.

Merri and I want to help you retire or expand with an everlasting income and extraordinary lifestyle at any age. To do this we are offering a report entitled “How to Gain Everlasting Health & Wealth”.

I’ll be selling this report for $49 but before it is complete I am offering this report free to get feed back from you, our loyal readers.

One of the things that this report explains is why after listening to music from composers like Handel,  I then would listen to more active music.

You can hear all of this music in the free report described below.

This report is about how to absorb, recall and retain information but can also be important if you have any health concerns.  The report tells how music has helped with memory problems and says:

The man had not spoken in three or four years. An older man in the late stages of Alzheimer’s, he could no longer care for himself and required a high level of assistance in his daily activities of living.

But on one particular day, Concetta Tomaino, DA, a certified music therapist, offered a different kind of dementia therapy-she sang an old Yiddish song to him and some of her other patients. “You could tell by his face that he was watching,” recalls Tomaino. From a man in his condition, attention was a lot to ask for.

“Whenever I got a chance I played this song to him and sang to him. Within a month of doing this, he was making an attempt to speak, and he eventually started singing the song himself. He also started talking again. He continued talking and lived for many years after that.”

 “How to Use Super Thinking to Gain Everlasting Health & Wealth” free in this very limited time offer.

This report will sell for $49 but  during the beta period, you can have it FREE by clicking here.

Please enjoy and share how you feel and let me know.

The more we know, we know, the better we are.  Now we know how we know better with music and I hope this knowing helps make this day for you… and everyone after… better.

Gary

Learn more about memory, health and Omega 3

Learn how to use music and super thinking to write to sell.

A scientific  American website article “Why Walking through a Doorway Makes You Forget”

Wall Street Journal Looking for a perfect tune for your workout?

 


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