Multi Dimensional Cool


Multi dimensional living is cool and I believe you’ll see it growing HOT as a lifestyle of choice that brings better health and lasting “real” wealth.  Many readers  are choosing a multi dimensional lifestyle, living on a farm and earning in other ways such as writing.

gary scott farm

Activity on the farm in North Carolina. It’s tax deductible and profitable but…

gary scott farm

I cannot call it work.

Merri and I have been fortunate. The self publishing business has treated us well.  However a great deal of our financial stability also comes from being multi dimensional.  We have lived on our own farm and seminar camp and orange grove and in our own Ecuador hotel and hacienda.  We are always fixing things up…. buying broken places or taking broken ideas and making them whole.

For decades we have been buying houses and fixing them… painting, restructuring and such.  This is our hobby… that happens to be profitable… or maybe that’s our business and writing is the hobby that also happens to be profitable?

The point is what we do is not work.   We just regularly do what we love and figure out how to earn income in the process.  The adage framed on my desk given to me by a beloved Indian Pundit is “Action is Thy Duty… Reward Not Thy Concern“. With this motto and a bit of common sense living joyfully and earning merge.

Our daughter, Cinda, and David Cross, our son-in-law webmaster and granddaughters, Sequoia and Teeka, have taken this lifestyle route as well.   Cinda loves animals so is a veterinarian and specializes in animal acupuncture which she can do at their farm.

David has his website and voice-over business he can run from their farm and the girls love working in the gardens.

webmaster's garden

webmaster's garden

David and Cinda’s multi dimensional farm

They have reached the stage where 60% of their food is home grown and they are starting to sell and barter their extra crops.

I have encouraged David to write about this and he has now developed his “Water the Roots” website.

This site is a rich multi dimensional primer because David is “walking his talk”.  He has hands-on marketing experience that spans 25 years in 22 countries for companies and charities large and small.  He’s guided many companies and individuals to success in business and helped them achieve their marketing goals, both online and offline.

As Senior Internet Consultant to Agora Inc. in Baltimore, MD, David worked closely with Agora’s publishers and marketers and over an 8-year period helped to propel Agora’s online revenues to over $300 Million in 2009.

At the same time, he has followed his dream of greater self-sufficiency for food, power and water tending the land and caring for the farm and animals.

David adds to his multi dimensional activities as a professional voiceover. He built his own voiceover studio nestled on the family’s  organic farm and recent projects include work for American Express and foursquare.

Here is David’s second issue of Water the Roots.  See how to receive it regularly below.

Gary

davidappletree

David Cross harvesting apples on his farm.


Christmas. And I never expected that we’d be the ones receiving the church “charity” Christmas basket. Every year we contributed to our church gift baskets with dried and canned foods, baked goods, and also helped to collect second-hand clothes, games and toys. And every Christmas without fail we drove to houses in our neighborhood to give these baskets out to families who needed help.

In the spring of 1978 my dad had a major stroke, and by late autumn the sick pay from his job had run out and we began to realize that he may never work full-time again (he never did).  A year ago my dad beat me to a race around the block and I owed him One Pound. Today he needed assistance to walk anywhere.

I was scared and things felt bleak, then just before Christmas my mum left a whole week’s food shopping on the bus. We ate a lot of potatoes that week!

A couple of days before Christmas the doorbell rang, and we received two gift baskets from our church plus a bag with some second-hand clothes for us. I felt a combination of cold and warm at the same time. Cold that we needed the help…after all, we’d always been the ones who gave to others. But warm that I didn’t feel so isolated and alone any more and that someone cared.

I remember that Christmas long ago as one of the best ever. Although we had few material gifts, all that mattered was the simple pleasure of all being together. Nothing else came close because we had each other.

Simple 2.0

Part of the personal journey everyone makes on the path to greater self sufficiency means evaluating how we spend our time…at home, at work and at play. For example today it’s a bright, frosty winter day. If I fancy a nice salad and need decent organic lettuce and salad leaves, I can drive to the store or I can walk out into our greenhouse and pick what I like.

Somewhere in early-2012 we stopped watching television. Or that is, we dropped cable TV in favor of movies we chose to watch via DVD and some streaming TV.

Not having the distraction of TV frees-up an immense amount of time but an added benefit is that this Christmas our children didn’t repeat the “For Christmas we want…” mantra, because they weren’t being bombarded by advertisements selling them toys they needed to feel happy.

And so once again, this Christmas we simply enjoyed being a close family and the darkness outside was brightened by the warmth, lights and joy in our home. What mattered this year was the magic of family, and of simply enjoying our time spent together.

Getting Started on Your Self-Sufficient Path

People ask me with increasingly regularity how they can get started growing their own food, moving into the countryside or any of the other things we do, such as rearing our own meat, hunting, fishing, making cheese or – like today – brewing beer and making sausages.

One of my favorite chefs and food writers is Michael Ruhlman, and his book Charcuterie is a joy to read and to use. In the FAQs at his blog he answers – simply and straightforwardly – the oft-posed question of, “I want to be a food writer–can you give me any advice?” His response is:

“Write. That’s all there is to it. In my opinion you have to be able to write first–about anything. Once you can write, then you can turn your writing toward your passions for food.”

To borrow the same response, “How can I get started growing my own food/moving to the countryside/rearing my own meat/fishing/hunting/{insert your question here}?” then yes, I’d certainly recommend “Get Started/Just Do It!” but I know that there is much more to it than that.

My goal here is to share with you our own journey of what happened after we “just started” but also to give you, if not a path, then at least a fairly decent trail of breadcrumbs you may use as a helpful indication of which direction to head.

“Just start” is prescriptive. Yes, please do get started. Now. Today. “Just Do It!

This blog, however, is descriptive. There’s no point in my prescribing that you grow avocados if you live in Alaska nor suggest that you plant garlic in mid-summer in Phoenix. But hopefully I will share enough to allow you to take larger and larger steps in the right direction.

And at the start of your journey the biggest thing I learned that you’ll need is one, simple ingredient…

Time

Without the time, you will never do any of this and in future you’ll look back over time and wonder why you never started. But time is also about priorities, and about what is important to you and in making time for that.

I’ve always found the phrase “making time” amusing…as if you can just create more time out of thin air, and create more hours than there are in a day.

But I believe that you can create new time by deciding what is important to you and working toward that.

Be honest with yourself. You know how much time you spend watching TV, visiting social media sites, driving to and from the office, reading the news or in catching up on gossip with acquaintances. Mashable’s article from November 2012 shows how much time is spent on social media sites – the average person spends a whopping 6.75 hours a month on Facebook alone – and you probably have a good idea of how much new time you could create by readjusting some of the similar time hogs in your life.

Clearing the Weeds

Here’s the magical thing about freeing-up time…about making time: if you can find just one hour a day, that’s four, eight-hour days a month and that is enough time to grow food to feed your family. My friend Vanessa realized that now she works at home four days a week, the time she saves not having to commute to the office (two hours round trip) is all she needs to get started.

Wherever you are in your journey – and I know if you’re reading this there’s a good chance you are at the start – the first thing to do is free up time to get started.

In my next blog post I’ll share some ideas of how to start using the time you’ve freed-up. Until then, make time

Sign up for Water the roots here.

David

See why we believe in multi dimensional living with self publishing now.

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